Student Awards

 

 2016

Frederick Stearne Award

Anna Conrick

Between: Three Screens

‘Between: Three Screens’ explores the complex interactions of memory and materiality in our understanding of place. Working with a cross-disciplinary process adapted from anthropological fieldwork and process-led design practice, it is a critical examination of The Astor Theatre in St Kilda, one of Melbourne's longest running and most celebrated single screen cinemas. Positing memory as both entity and activity continually constituted through physical and mental processes, this project seeks to identify the potential of cross-disciplinary working methods to contribute to new understandings of place as both real and imagined. Re-contextualising site through processes of assemblage and re-making directly impacts its perception and production. This project proposes a new approach to historical sites that recognises place as both material object and space of the imagination.

 

Bates Smart Award

Sharon Sclarr

Composing Connections

‘Composing Connections’ explores the relationship between the human body and its surroundings. Our everyday experiences are coloured by culturally conditioned thoughts and behavioural habits that develop unconscious practices and modes of inhabiting space. This project seeks to shift habitual experience through heightening awareness and altering spatial sensations. The site for this project is the proposed Melbourne CBD North underground train station. It draws from the way people inhabit and traverse the city as well as the existing relationships between surface and the subterranean as a way of uncovering alternate trajectories. Through composing space and materials to resonate with the inhabitants’ imagination, new experiences of being within a transitional and underground space emerge. This project proposes that interwoven levels, viewpoints and unexpected juxtapositions can open up new experiences within this site. Light as a medium, and space as an experience, are utilised to provoke a sense of delight in the visitor.

 

RMIT Interior Design Innovation Award

Tim Percy

B.I.G I.A.N

As digital-physical environments converge, what affect does this convergence have on the interface and ultimately, the identity of the user? Everyday we inhabit spatial environments, occupying both corporeal and virtual space. It is proposed that we inhabit this digital and physical space simultaneously - while being able to focus our attention on one or the other, we are always occupying both. I.A.N (Interactive Avatar Network) provides an inquiry into these digital-physical environments through a physical interaction with an individual’s digital avatar. By auditing the user’s digital presence through B.I.G (Bilateral Intelligent Gatherer), a personal big data mining application, the avatar is created. It is hoped that through this interaction we will seek to question the availability of our digital presence and also the affect this digital presence has on our physical self.

 

 

 

Artichoke Magazine Award

Timothy Quirk

Nowhereness

‘Nowhereness’ exists within a moment of interlude, when you become transfixed, motionless with wonder and for a brief period of time your consciousness is positioned more within your mental state than within your physical space. Taking into consideration the possibility to produce specific models for interaction within our spatial environment and the potential to construct atmospheres which purposefully and positively affect wellbeing, this project produces a concept hotel which considers the relationship between people and their immediate surroundings and explores how certain modes of interaction can produce the psychological and physiological result of slowing down. ‘Slow House’ aims to address preconceived notions of a hotel experience by disrupting and challenging conventional spaces and user journeys and by bringing people’s awareness to the present encounter. The result is a considered design and situations that provoke increased levels of curiosity, wonder and feelings of calm, respite and interlude.

 

 
 
 
 

  2015

IDEA Inception Award

Gold winner, Laura Casey

Rearranging Place
An exploration into the relationship between space and place.

Rearranging place is a project which stemmed from enquiry into the relationship between place and space. Space was defined as a practiced terrain, the formation of relations between matter. Place was defined as a time dependent entity existing in the past, present and future. In essence this research analysed the creation of places and how the transformation from a location being a place to a space or vice versa occurs.

Finalist, Jackson Hexin Bi

GOTYA Graduate Of The Year Award

Commendation, Laurelai Uldrikis

The Place Becomes

Inspired by how the built environment can have a profound impact on our experience and perception of the everyday, this project explores the role of interior design upon personal wellbeing. This is approached through the notion of respite, as an event and facilitator for mental pause where emotional transformation can occur. Through themes surrounding the de-stabilisation of reality, perception and imagination, (non) enclosure, boundary, and contrast, this work proposes an expanded notion of respite. An engagement with space is encouraged such that the body and mind occupy multivarient states, offering pause from site, situation, and self. Culminating in the design of a high school arts centre, this project proposes a set of new strategies for the design of educational space.

Frederick Stearne Award

Laura Casey

Rearranging Place
An exploration into the relationship between space and place

Rearranging place is a project which stemmed from enquiry into the relationship between place and space. Space was defined as a practiced terrain, the formation of relations between matter. Place was defined as a time dependent entity existing in the past, present and future. In essence this research analysed the creation of places and how the transformation from a location being a place to a space or vice versa occurs.

Bates Smart Award

Laura Casey

Rearranging Place
An exploration into the relationship between space and place

Rearranging place is a project which stemmed from enquiry into the relationship between place and space. Space was defined as a practiced terrain, the formation of relations between matter. Place was defined as a time dependent entity existing in the past, present and future. In essence this research analysed the creation of places and how the transformation from a location being a place to a space or vice versa occurs.

Artichoke Magazine Award

Alana Fahey

In Display

‘In Display’ is concerned with creating situations of display and positing the subsequent encounter as an event. The project explores the gallery as structure for display alongside relationships that are discovered between art-object and site. Following a departure from the gallery as site, how might display continue to facilitate a platform for experimentation and conversation? Interested in the relationship between contemporary art and design, the project aims to test the role of the manifesto as provocation for design and dialogue. ‘In Display’ is an exploration in concurrently designing structure and program.
The project proposes a series of talks in relation to individual practice and in declaring strategies toward a manifesto. These strategies are explored spatially via a physical, changeable platform that is influenced by the dialogue occurring within. In this way, the project begins to explore structure as a frame for a situation.

RMIT Interior Design Innovation Award

Khanh Ho

Common Ground

As our urban centres around the world experience rapid densification and growing populations, people’s homes and private spaces are becoming smaller and harder to afford. Within this context, this research explores the
importance of shared public spaces – how they are used and the role they play within communities. Le Van Tam Park, located in central Ho Chi Minh City, is the site for this design project. It has been observed that the park provides opportunities for recreational activities, conversations and the freedom to
share information, knowledge and ideas. The project has developed a system of tools and devices to better enable the community within the park, providing comfort and a sense of belonging. In doing so, the project aims to make design more relevant and accessible by responding directly to the reality of the site and the community – local customs and policies, material accessibility and existing construction knowledge.

 

  2014

Artichoke Magazine Award

Tara McDonough

Dis-Placed

Motivated by a desire to shed light on a significant yet largely overlooked episode in recent social history, this project explores the institutions that housed British child migrants in Australia from the 1930s-1960s. Bindoon Boys Home (1936-1966) in WA is one such institution, where the child migrants sent there were also tasked with its elaborate construction. Through the layering of this historic site within a contemporary gallery, the exhibition functions as an inhabitable collage – a space that seeks to uncover the architecture of physical and psychological displacement, the power of place and the role of the interior in shaping individual experience.

tara mcdonough.jpg
 

2013

Artichoke Magazine Award

Hannah Moriarty

Intriguing Interrelationships: Towards a New Gallery

This research is the exploration into future and gallery display. By introducing framing structures and reflective surfaces into the gallery, the exhibition display becomes a viewing apparatus for experiencing both the artwork and the space simultaneously. Within the work there is a desire to create an active subject, one who can be empowered by the experience of physical participation. The work engages with the surfaces of the gallery space, allowing for the subjects’ view within the space to collapse and flatten. For a fleeting moment they become displayed as one with the artwork.