Specialisation

Third + Fourth Year
ARCH1289, ARCH1290, ARCH1291, ARCH1292, ARCH1293

90 Maribyrnong  St. Footscray Portrait.jpg

RE-IMAGINING HOSPITALITY

Tutor: Ana Calic
Schedule: Wednesday 18:00 - 21:00
Location: 100.06.002

SUMMARY

Rethinking and re-imaging conventional design typologies forms the basis of this Specialisations unit. Closely interrogating hospitality design, alongside retail, boutique accommodation and co-working opportunities, innovative design solutions will surface creating blended spaces which encourage new forms of human occupation and interaction. 

Students will work alongside a real client and site to simulate design processes experienced within the design industry. The journey begins at the iconic heritage listed Lonely Planet HQ in Footscray. Through rigorous analysis and investigation of the building’s existing fabric students will form a deep understanding of the site forming a rich platform which will facilitate creativity, testing and experimentation. 

Each individual’s approach to the site and client brief will in- form their concept which will become the underlying driver behind all design decisions and ultimately manifesting three dimensionally to form the final design outcome. Through critical analysis, sketching, drawing and researching students will develop their own sense of design style to produce a final design solution which they will present to the client and their peers. 



 

 
Image by Dayne Trower

Image by Dayne Trower

Three Concepts: Steel Window and Door Detailing

Tutor: Dayne Trower
Schedule: Wednesday 9:30 - 12:30
Location: 100.04.004

SUMMARY

The problem of designing windows and doors is a rational one, but also an artistic one. How does this problem and the practical realities of weatherproofing, opening, sliding and weight resolve themselves in a purposeful yet beautiful solution? Comprehension of the use of shadow and light as a device in amplifying a particular atmosphere is also to be investigated in the practice of this course. For this Specialisation unit, students will be designing a series of three apertures / openings, that all utilise the primary material of steel. The site for these three interventions is Siteworks, 33 Saxon Street, Brunswick.

Three Concepts:
The Three Concepts required in the course are as follows:
1. The Study Bay - a projecting window to provide a quiet place for reading, repose, contemplation
2. An Entry Portal - a threshold from outside to inside providing shelter, inclination of a new experience or disruption
3. Servery Window - the focal hub, a functioning embodiment of exchange, culture, communication

Format:

The course meets once a weeks for three hours, meeting promptly at 9:30am, with a short break midway through. Each ‘Concept’ is a four week exercise, culminating with a single curated A1 3 drawing that clearly demonstrates the technical and atmospheric imperatives of the course. Each of these will be submitted in two formats – as a PDF file and printed A1. Whilst they are separate projects, you should consider them as cumulative or as a series. As such, graphic representation, layout and typography should be consistent throughout. Model making and 1:1 steel prototyping will also form part of the design process. Readings, case studies, tutorials: Readings and/or case studies will be assigned at the beginning of each ‘Concept’. It is expected that students will complete the readings and critically analyse the information for discussion in class. In this way, we are more akin to a review, marking up drawings, sketching and the like. For this to occur constructively, class participation and weekly contribution is critical.

 
Pentridge Prison D Division

Pentridge Prison D Division

REENVISION D DIVISION

Tutor: Chris Tomoya
Schedule: Wednesday 12:30 - 15:30
Location: 100.04.006

SUMMARY

D-Division was the remand division for Pentridge prison in Coburg and has been in operation from 1894 up until 1997. Since its closure it has been left almost untouched: a developer purchased the property and tried to activate the space in the 2000’s by turning the prison cells in to wine cellars but bad management lead to the company going bankrupt and the space remains largely under-utilised.

Reenvision D Division tasks students with identifying a function and use of a former prison cell within the D-Division building at Pentridge. Design a space which optimises the small 6 sqm space with a primary focus on joinery design and detailing. As a heritage listed building with a very somber past, it is up to students to identify a potential use or function for the space, which respects the past but also looks to the future use of this historic building.

The main themes for this subject are: designing for small spaces, joinery design, detailing, and model making with rapid prototyping.

 
Image by Hannah Moriarty

Image by Hannah Moriarty

Functional Aesthetics

Tutor: Hannah Moriarty
Schedule: Wednesday 9:30 - 12:30
Location: 100.06.004

SUMMARY

Bus Projects is an artist-run gallery, who support critical, conceptual and interdisciplinary practices. Bus Projects has announced that they are moving to the new Collingwood arts precinct (CAP) this year.

This specialisation will propose a new multi-functional gallery model which encourages new spatial connections and transaction.

Functional Aesthetics will analyse existing relational and functional working conditions of the gallery. Through these observations the students will manipulate the spatial arrangement, using diagrammatic + curatorial constructs, to design an adaptable space which supports both its community and program.

 
Image by Phoebe Baker-Gabb

Image by Phoebe Baker-Gabb

SECOND SITE

Tutor: Phoebe Baker-Gabb
Schedule: Wednesday 18:00 - 21:00
Location: 100.06.003

SUMMARY

This specialisation engages with the fields of retail and exhibition design and focuses on sustainability. Students will design an exhibition stand at Denfair for their chosen client. At the end of the three day long fair, the exhibition stand will be need to transported, transformed and will need to adapt to their second site and its particular conditions.

This specialisation recognises the inherent sustainability issues surrounding furniture fair and event design and seeks to extend the lifespan of the design through a second site and additional purpose. Students will investigate materiality and design techniques that allow for stands to be repurposed into a new site. They will work through the process and requirements of building, deconstructing, transporting and reconstructing their design. Student will produce a series of sequence drawings that explain the timeline of their stand. Students will engage in design workshops with their peers, create a concept presentation to present to their client and produce a series of technical diagrams to explain their ideas to a contractor.

 
This Sign (For Scrap Metal) 2011 by Micah Lexier

This Sign (For Scrap Metal) 2011 by Micah Lexier

nəʊˈteɪʃ(ə)n

Tutor: Phoebe Whitman
Schedule: Wednesday 9.30 - 12.30
Location: 100.06.004

SUMMARY

This specialisation will explore notation, as a concept, practice, approach, compositional device, artifact, spatial situation. By exploring notations through various mediums, students will experiment with the intricate relationships between mark-making, text, graphics, images and space. 

The practice of notation is a means to communicate thought and intention. Sometimes these gestures are predetermined, and a designed approach, while other notations can be the effect of residues made from incidental marks, contingent on unplanned forces such as temporality and movement. The potential of notations through various mark-making processes, like a form of language, means there will be a potentially dynamic and fragile meaning put into form. As notations are indeterminate, as they require mediums and media, but in their creation are also in-between communication and knowledge, understanding and misinterpretation. 

The Melbourne-based poet, architect and academic, Dr. Alex Selenitsch writes that notation is a way of inventing a composition, of putting together a complex artifact or a set of relationships. Where this emergence; fuzziness, ambiguity, materiality, misinterpretation and mistakes are valued. (Selenitsch, 2015. p267) 

This specialisation will ask students to produce notations as a vehicle that takes on many modes, such as marks, annotations, footnotes, symbols, writing and other visual gestures. This project will involve the work to take on an indeterminate space between representation and abstraction, which requires interpretation and translation that means a compound of readings, implications and dynamics are produced and where potentialities and slippages can transpire.

 
Two Way Hinged by Roger Kemp, Anthony Fryatt & Katie Collins

Two Way Hinged by Roger Kemp, Anthony Fryatt & Katie Collins

A SURE THING

Tutor: Katie Collins
Schedule: Wednesday 13:30 - 16:30
Location: 100.01.004 (workshop)

SUMMARY

A well-made object is informed by thousands of years of accumulated experiment and know-how. Whenever we make or use an everyday tangible thing, or even when we contemplate one seriously, we commune with this pool of human understanding. 
Fewer, better things, 2018 Glenn Adamson

This specialisation will explore how objects are made, where they live, and the stories they tell. 

Beginning with the investigation of material through hand fabrication, traditional metalworking and goldsmithing techniques will be implemented, including cutting, joining and forming. These techniques will stand as a starting point with the opportunity to be expanded upon, allowing for new details to be designed and therefore, new objects made. Through this material and technical exploration, students will be asked to consider how material and detail aid in communicating the stories and ideas within objects. 

In looking at the lives of objects, questions will extend to the modes of display of objects in domestic, retail and exhibition environments. 

How does site and situation impact upon our understanding and reading of objects? Students will be asked to reflect on and critique this through research, observation and documentation. 

These elements will combine in the final brief through the making of a small-scale object, which aims to express a story through its design, materiality, detail, siting and situation. 

Classes will take place in the workshop, requiring engagement with workshop practices and structures to develop an understanding of professional fabrication and detail at various scales.

 
Wood Would.jpg

WOOD WOULD

Tutor: David Poulton
Schedule: Wednesday 9:30 - 12:30
Location: 100.01.004 (workshop)

SUMMARY

Through this specialisation students will  have a broader understanding and sensitivity towards trees, their contribution and capacities. Trees provide essential things for life, such as oxygen, clean water, regulating climatic conditions, improving the landscape and environmental conditions, sustain wildlife as well as providing us with warmth and beauty. This specialisation will explore these qualities and the potentialities of trees. 

Do trees talk? What do trees do? Have you watched a tree grow? 

Through a series of hands-on activities, site visits, documentation processes and material experiments, students will develop a critical understanding of the processes involved with a tree becoming wood. Importantly students will explore what wood would do. Through this process of working with wood, students will come to understand what is appropriate, ethical and possible with wood. 

When does a tree become wood? When does wood become timber? What is veneer and why would you use it? 

 
Christopher Boots Showroom

Christopher Boots Showroom

LIGHTING FOR A LIGHTING DESIGNER

Tutor: Ali Loader
Schedule: Wednesday 18:00 - 21:00
Location: 100.01.003 (SIAL)

SUMMARY

This specialisation will focus on the profession and practices of Specialist Architectural Lighting Design.

Students will receive their design brief from local renowned industrial designer, Christopher Boots. Both Christopher’s workshops and showroom are located in Fitzroy. Students will engage with the principles of branding and branded environments – and most essentially, learn how to employ light as a powerful medium through which to transform space.

Students must integrate light within architectural elements of the building in ways that communicate the essence of Christopher’s “brand” and more over, his personal identity and values within his place of work. The design out comes will see students execute an architectural lighting design for a real world project.

The course work pathway will shape independent investigations into focused topic streams and allow students to refine technical mastery with in their area of interest.

The outcomes of coursework will see students produce interior designs that showcase evocative and innovative applications of lighting integrated within the fabric of architecture.

Students will pitch their designs to a panel consisting of the client, Christopher Boots, Christopher’s shareholders, and select industry professionals from the field of Specialist Architectural Lighting Design.

 
Image by Pandarosa

Image by Pandarosa

EXPENDABLE EMBLEMS

Tutor: Ariel Aguilera + Andrea Benyi (Pandarosa)
Schedule: Wednesday 12:30 - 15:30
Location: 100.06.004

SUMMARY

This unit will explore ideas relating to semiotics, iconography, symbolism and interpretative representation. Through various in class workshops and site visitations, participants will be asked to develop their own research and design methodology in relation to their work. Tasks within the unit will be put through a series of processes including deconstruction, reconstruction, repetition, disassembling and reassembling in order to extract simplified graphical qualities and create an iconographic and symbolistic communicative visual language. These findings will then be gradually translated and evaluated via peer review for their spatial potential through built propositions. The aim will be to bridge an informative line between spatial disciplines, thus exploring a dialogue between dimensional fields, as well as explore the interpretation of signs and symbols.

 
Image by Christian Grossi

Image by Christian Grossi

ON THE TOOLS

Tutor: Christian Grossi
Schedule: Wednesday 15:30 - 18:30
Location: 100.04.008 (PC Lab)

SUMMARY

Walked through a commercial project, students will be exposed to the powerful design tool; Revit and the evolution of a BIM model over a projects life. By knowing your tools, the designer can effectively, quickly and accurately communicate one1s design, manage budgets, and ensure what one is proposing is buildable. Students will learn how to model, consider, organise and troubleshoot their way through a model, to then create documentation/diagrams/visuals that will excite and effectively communicate intention with no uncertainty. 

The class will be issued a brief to a real life project, the class as a whole will be asked to develop an interior concept which will then be modeled and documented (Including traditional and non traditional documenting). The workload will be shared between all students, where they will all contribute to the same model, exposing them to collaborative modeling. There will be two assessments; one on the communication of the design which will reflect the concept phase of a real life project, the second will be the documentation of the various elements which will reflect the detail design component of a professional project. This will produce 2 folio pieces, one creative and the other technical.