Specialisation

Third + Fourth Year
ARCH1289, ARCH1290, ARCH1291, ARCH1292, ARCH1293

2_Alt-Interiors Web Image.jpg

ALT-INTERIORS

Tutor: Nick Rebstadt
Schedule: Monday 18:00 - 21:00
Location: 100.05.005

SUMMARY

This specialisation is about design in a 21st century dominated by irony, ‘post- truth’, gentrification, trolling and whatever else. It’s for those interested in using theory to begin to navigate the current moment, critique propositional design and strategic thinking for ‘alt-interiors’.

Working through the often-abrasive relationship between ideology of ‘disruption’ and the realities of practice, students will be encouraged to imagine alternatives to current practices and develop propositions for potential change; evaluating current strategies, theories, methods and locations employed by designers, activists and self-described ‘disruptors’ – from Athens antifa, property development in Collingwood to Fashwave, fashion and neobanks.

Alt-Interiors will culminate in a proposition for disruptive change backed by a series of activities, round-tables and workshops completed collectively as a group through the semester.

*This specialisation is heavily participatory.


 

 
7+8_ON-THE-TOOLS-WEB.jpg

ON THE TOOLS 1

Tutor: Christian Grossi
Schedule: Monday 13:30 - 16:30
Location: 100.05.008

SUMMARY

Design philosophy and intent, executed using industry standard tool, Revit. Tutor: Christian Grossi walked through a commercial project, students will be exposed to the powerful design tool; Revit and the evolution of a BIM model over a projects life. By knowing your tools, the designer can effectively, quickly and accurately communicate one’s design, manage budgets, and ensure what one is proposing is buildable. Students will learn how to model, consider, organise and troubleshoot their way through a model, to then create documentation/diagrams/visuals that will excite and effectively communicate intention with no uncertainty. 

The class will be issued a brief to a real life project, the class as a whole will be asked to develop an interior concept which will then be modelled and documented (including traditional and non traditional documenting). The workload will be shared between all students, where they will all contribute to the same model, exposing them to collaborative modelling. There will be two assessments; one on the communication of the design which will reflect the concept phase of a real life project, the second will be the documentation of the various elements which will reflect the detail design component of a professional project. This will produce 2 folio pieces, one creative and the other technical.

 
7+8_ON-THE-TOOLS-WEB.jpg

ON THE TOOLS 2

Tutor: Christian Grossi
Schedule: Monday 17:00 - 20:00
Location: 100.05.008

SUMMARY

Design philosophy and intent, executed using industry standard tool, Revit. Tutor: Christian Grossi walked through a commercial project, students will be exposed to the powerful design tool; Revit and the evolution of a BIM model over a projects life. By knowing your tools, the designer can effectively, quickly and accurately communicate one’s design, manage budgets, and ensure what one is proposing is buildable. Students will learn how to model, consider, organise and troubleshoot their way through a model, to then create documentation/diagrams/visuals that will excite and effectively communicate intention with no uncertainty. 

The class will be issued a brief to a real life project, the class as a whole will be asked to develop an interior concept which will then be modelled and documented (including traditional and non traditional documenting). The workload will be shared between all students, where they will all contribute to the same model, exposing them to collaborative modelling. There will be two assessments; one on the communication of the design which will reflect the concept phase of a real life project, the second will be the documentation of the various elements which will reflect the detail design component of a professional project. This will produce 2 folio pieces, one creative and the other technical.

 
Instant City in a Feild Long Elevation, 1969 Architgram

Instant City in a Feild Long Elevation, 1969 Architgram

INSTANT CITY  

Tutor: Millie Cattlin
Schedule: Wednesday 12:00 - 15:00
Location: 100.05.007

SUMMARY

RMIT Workplace Design Competition

50 years ago, in 1969, Archigram proposed Instant City – at the time a radical idea that predicted an interconnected and mobile future. “This city superimposes, for a time, new spaces for communication onto an existing city.” We will use this project as a context and background whilst we consider the following questions about life and work, about cities, cultures and economies:

What is work?

What is the future of work?

How do you work?

Building 106 is going to be a 10,600 square metre office that will house over 1000 RMIT staff over three floors of QV. This is a live project – a collaboration between ARM and Geyer – to design centralized workspaces for several RMIT teams. Students will be briefed by, and will present to, the design teams, and select student projects will be awarded with the opportunity to work within these practices, working with the design teams in having their projects realised.

“The Building 106 project is much more than an office relocation. The project will bring our people together to collaborate across functions, communicate and share information and achieve better outcomes for our students and our people.”

 
Spacial Branding.jpg

SPACIAL BRANDING

Tutor: Andii Benyi
Schedule: Wednesday 13:00-16:00
Location: 100.06.007

SUMMARY

The unit will explore the development of branding visual language from its initial graphical representations into dynamic, versatile and befitting solutions suited to a variety of spacial interior applications. Through a method of deconstruction, repetition, disassembling and reassembling the unit will aim to expand the conceptual basis of branding language in order to transcend its implementation into the spacial field, thus creating a more holistic and in-depth branding experience.

 
Bernard Tschumi, The Manhattan Transcripts Episode 4: The Block 1980-1981

Bernard Tschumi, The Manhattan Transcripts Episode 4: The Block 1980-1981

L,M,S

Tutor: Jamie Vella
Schedule: Wednesday 13:30 - 16:30
Location: 100.01.004

SUMMARY

The core theme of this specialisation will be detail, with consideration of the term from a technical and theoretical perspective. A detail highlights and expresses a moment of significance within a larger scope. In design drawings such detail can be in the way a design is to be constructed, a function which needs to be performed or an aesthetic element. By extruding and expressing a detail with clarity, we are able to clearly define these important aspects of our design intention. In this respect, detail can also be applied to how we approach design with groundings in theoretical concepts, with the same idea of extraction of points of note and clear expression of such being applied to the way in which we will analyse and interpret these concepts.

Whilst a detail is considered to be a small significant aspect which is part of a larger scope, this specialisation will investigate where and how detail occurs by working through design in specific large, medium and small scale stages. By using these positions to define space, form and action, we aim to firstly clarify at what point the term “detail” applies. Working between the large, medium and small allows an examination of scale within these categories, asking what detail means within and outside of context.

We will work site specifically over the semester (site TBC) through areas of programming of site (large), joinery and individual users (medium) and task specific concerns (small). Students will be assigned a user within the space on which to base a design that will addresses the needs of that specific individual. They will also be asked to work collaboratively with other individual users of the space in order to consider how their design will function within this greater context.

 
Yin-Lan Dann.jpg

INFRA-TERIORITY

Tutor: Ying-Lan Dann
Schedule: Wednesday 13:00 - 16:00
Location: 100.04.007

SUMMARY

How might infrastructural processes of transmission, accretion, incompletion and reciprocity become ways of designing?

Transmission: What can drawing transmit and how?

Accretion: How might accretion permit an understanding of design process?

In-completion: When is a design complete? Should it ever be?

Reciprocity: How can you learn from and feed back into a given site, or system?

 
Reframe.jpg

REFRAME

Tutor: Phoebe Baker-Gabb
Schedule: Wednesday 18:00 - 21:00
Location: 100.05.006

SUMMARY

This specialisation engages with the fields of retail and exhibition design and focuses on design as a form of communication. Students will be asked to design an exhibition stand at a Furniture Fair for their chosen client. The exhibition stand will showcase their client’s brand and products and will be required to react to, and engage with, the visually dense environment of a fair. This special- isation views the practice of interior design as a method of communication and asks that students think critically about their audience and specifically tailor the ‘informa- tion’ that they produce to that audience.

Furniture fairs are hybrid spaces; part retail showroom, part exhibition space. You will require an innovative and experimental design approach in order to differentiate your stand from others and market your client’s brand to the design community and the public. You will engage with the fairs’ context, program and conditions to produce a site specific design response within this framework.

Students will engage in design workshops with their peers, develop a design language to communicate their ideas to their chosen client and then adapt this language to explain their stand design to a contractor/builder and the furniture fair design team.

This specialisation seeks to develop students’ under- standing of the concept and initial design development process and allows them to explore how best to communicate their design ideas to various but specific audiences.

 
LIGHTING.jpg

LIGHTING FOR A LIGHTING DESIGNER

Tutor: Ali Loader
Schedule: Wednesday 18:00 - 21:00
Location: 100.05.007

SUMMARY

Students will receive their design brief from local renowned lighting designer, Christopher Boots.
Both Christopher's workshops and showroom are located in Fitzroy. Students will engage with the principles of branding and branded environments – and most essentially, learn how to employ light as a powerful medium through which to transform space.

This specialisation will focus on the profession and practices of a Specialist Architectural Lighting Designer. The design brief will be supplied by the acclaimed industrial lighting designer, Christopher Boots and the outcomes will see students execute an architectural lighting design for a real world project. Students will choose specific areas within Christopher's workshops, offices and showroom from which to base their design interventions. The coursework pathway will shape independent investigations into focused topic streams and allow students to refine technical mastery within their area of interest. Students must integrate light within architectural elements of the building in ways that communicate the essence of Christopher's "brand" and moreover, his personal identity and values within his place of work.

The outcomes of course work will see students produce interior designs that showcase evocative and innovative applications of lighting integrated within the fabric of architecture. Students will pitch their designs to a panel consisting of the client, Christopher Boots, Christopher's shareholders, and select industry professionals from the field of Specialist Architectural Lighting Design.