Design Studio

Second + Third Year
ARCH1108, ARCH1109, ARCH119, ARCH1121

Didier Courbot, needs Rome, 1999, from the series need. [Courtesy of Susan Hobbs Gallery]

Didier Courbot, needs Rome, 1999, from the series need. [Courtesy of Susan Hobbs Gallery]

dépense \ [de]growth

Tutors: James Carey
Schedule: Tuesday 9:00 - 12:00 + 13:00 - 16:00
Location: 100.04.004

SUMMARY

dépense \ [de]growth is an exploratory and process-based design studio that asks students to develop a thorough body of initial research into the post-industrial cities of Detroit, USA, Narva, Estonia and Oslo, Norway. Using this research, students will be asked to develop proposals that respond to one of these cities through temporal, material and spatial designs, focusing on the notions of ‘dépense’ and ‘[de]growth’ – the key exploratory concepts of the Oslo Architecture Triennale 2019. The studio will culminate in interior designs that respond to one of the above-mentioned cities, that incorporates an eventful and situational-responsive design for the notions of ‘dépense’ and ‘[de]growth’.

“Dépense is to spend excess energy on autotelic activities – those done as an end in themselves – in order to relish in the process and the journey, not only the outcome or the destination. This is exemplified in ritual and folk traditions, in craft and in design. While ‘[de]growth’ is categorically not about a nostalgic return to a pre-industrial era, we can afford to reflect and learn from the wisdom of our predecessors. We can afford to respect and enjoy tacit knowledge, flow state, and social festivity. Interior design has the potential to be a tantalising example of ‘dépense’; of social ritual. From the flow state of the design process, to the tacit knowledge embedded in the craft of making, to the social ritual and festivity of inhabiting spaces created for that purpose. In what ways can interior design benefit from being seen as a form of ‘dépense’? What is the social potential of this form of interior design? What would innovation in interior design look like if innovation was no longer guided by economically- focused efficiency imperatives, but by maximising energy expended through expressive civic rituals? What is interior design not as a service but as a collective act of cultural ritual? [Oslo Architecture Triennale 2019, Open Call, amended]

“Every city inevitably offers its particular disappointments. Perhaps it is these failures, rather than the usual postcard snapshots of perfection, that best describe the dynamics of a city? The things that are missing, unfinished, still undone, rather than the supposed satisfaction of things that worked, ideas that were realized, the sensible agreements, the satisfying compromises? Satisfaction and disappointment are both born of expectation. And what is a city, if not a field of expectations? The city is not; it is always becoming. A city may have a name, like “Oslo,” but it is not an object; it should be a verb, not a noun.”

Ingerid Helsing Almaas, “No app for that” https://www.e-flux.com/architecture/overgrowth/221609/no-app-for-that/

…….post-industrial city ------- [moving towards] post-industrial society…….

Students will work across a range of media including drawing, diagramming, film, photography, and model making. dépense \ [de]growth aims to explore how the discipline of interior design contributes meaningfully to ways of living, the urban interior and the [de]growth of contemporary cities.

Key Questions

If the interior is the relations between a confluence of forces, and interior designing is the intervention within these confluence of forces, what role do the notions of dépense \ [de]growth play in the process of interior design?
When do these confluence of forces come together to shape what it is we call the urban and public interior?
When is it important to allow dépense to come into the process of design?
When do we deign for [de]growth?

Technology Summary

The technology aspect of the studio will take part in a range of ways and through a succession of approaches to dépense, [de]growth, time, process, duration and the urban and public interior. Concepts of dépense, [de]growth, time, duration, situation, urban, public, the body, country and history, will be examined through small scale artefact making, site observation, drawing, mapping, diagramming, critical reading and documentation. In the second part of semester, students will produce a range of documents to communicate a proposal for an eventful and situational responsive design for the notions of ‘dépense’ and ‘[de]growth’, located in one of the cities as case studies. Students will also be asked to produce and experiment thoroughly with techniques of photography, drawing, mapping, diagramming, digital media, modelling, installation and temporal practices.

Student Capabilities

Students will learn through following activities and approaches:

Ability to engage critically and creatively with complex cultural and political issues
Ability to research and respond to theoretical concepts and precedent practices
Ability to explore specific and contemporary techniques and their relation to urban interior practice
Ability to explore making, drawing and image making to understand temporal and material relationships and their spatial effects
Respond, research and design in response to a specific brief
Ability to refine a design through multiple iterations
Ability to effectively communicate a series of design concepts through multiple visual and verbal techniques

Key Terms

dépense / degrowth / time / duration / temporal / process / technique / material / immaterial / urban interior / public interior / interiority / density / indeterminate / unfinished / incomplete / space / drawing / rendering / maintenance / care / action / body / site responsive / habitual / familiar / decay / patina / effect / affect / live / lived / civic consciousness

Precedents / References

Oslo Architecture Triennale 2019
Pierre Huyghe
Theaster Gates
Francis Alÿs
Gordon Matta-Clark
Régis Perray
Mierle Laderman Ukeles
Didier Courbot
Cyprian Gaillard
Rachel Sussman
Roland Roos
Roman Signer
Santiago Sierra
Popps Packing, Hamtramck USA
Powerhouse Productions, Hamtramck USA
The Heidelberg Project, Detroit USA
Oakland Avenue Urban Farm, Detroit USA
Catie Newell (Alibi Architecture)
Akoaki Architecture
Powerhouse Productions
Prince Concepts
Kengo Kuma
Shigeru Ban
Tadao Ando
SANAA
EFFEKT
Satouchi Art Triennale, Japan
Naoshima and Teshima, Japan
Narva Art Residency, Narva Estonia
Derry Temple by David Best
http://www.thiswilltaketime.org

Key Texts, Readings, Essays, Films

Giacomo D’Alisa, Federico Demaria, and Giorgos Kallis “Degrowth: A Vocabulary for a New Era”
Giorgos Kallis “In defense of degrowth”
Oslo Architecture Triennale 2019 Open Call
Ingerid Helsing Almaas No App for that - https://www.e-flux.com/architecture/overgrowth/221609/no-app-for-that/
Shannon Mattern Maintenance and Care: A working guide to the repair of rust, dust, cracks, and corrupted code in our cities, our homes, and our social relations.
https://placesjournal.org/article/maintenance-and-care/?cn-reloaded=1
Urban Interior: Informal explorations, interventions and occupations. Suzie Attiwill, Kate Church, Mick Douglas, Mathias Heyden, Rochus Urban Hinkel, Marieluise Jonas, Scott McQuire, Jane Rendell, Alex Schweder La, Malte Wagenfeld. Spurbuchverlag, Germany 2011.
Practicing with Deleuze: Design, Dance, Art, Writing, Philosophy, Suzie Attiwill, Terri Bird, Andrea Eckersley, Antonia Pont, Jon Roffe, Philipa Rothfield, Edinburgh University Press, 2017.
The Public Interior as Idea and Project, Mark Pimlott, JAP Publishing, 2016.
Suzie Attiwill Speeds, Slowness, Temporary Consistencies and Interior Designing. From: ‘Flow. Between Interior and Landscape’ (Bloomsbury 2017), Editors: Patricia Brown, Patricia Lara Betancourt, Gini Lee, Penny Sparke and Mark Taylor.
Manufacturing Urbanism: An architectural practice for unfinished cities. Gretchen Wilkins. PhD by Project, RMIT University 2012.
Maintenance Architecture, Hilary Sample, MIT Press, 2017.
Hyperart: Thomassons. Genpei Akasegawa. Kaya Press. 2009.
David Cross and Claire Doherty (eds.) One Day Sculpture. Kerber Verlag 2009.
Brian Dillon (ed.) Ruins: Documents of Contemporary Art. Whitechapel Gallery 2011.
Claire Doherty (ed.), Situation: Documents of Contemporary Art. Whitechapel Gallery, London. 2009.
Manifesto for Maintenance Art 1969!, Mierle Laderman Ukeles
Bergsonism, Gilles Deleuze
Mediators, Gilles Deleuze
Matter & Memory, Henri Bergson
Bergson, Deleuze and the Becoming of Unbecoming, Elizabeth Grosz, Parallax, Volume 11, Number 2
Constellations: or the reassertion of time into critical spatial practice, Jane Rendell 2009.
Thought in the Act, Erin Manning & Brian Massumi, 2014.
Invisible Cities. Italo Calvino. (1st Harvest/HBJ ed., A Harvest/HBJ book). New York: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich. 1978.
A Burglar’s Guide to the City. Geoff Manaugh. New York: Fsg Originals, 2016.
Haydn, Florian., and Temel, Robert. Temporary Urban Spaces : Concepts for the Use of City Spaces. Basel: Birkhäuser, 2006.
Kulper, Perry, and Nat Chard. “Pamphlet Architecture 34: Fathoming the
Unfathomable.” (2013).
Kiib, Hans. Performative Urban Design. Aalborg [Denmark]: Aalborg University Press, 2010.
Towards Anarchitecture:, Gordon Matta-Clark & Le Corbusier, James Attlee
Drawing Futures: Speculations in Contemporary Drawing for Art and Architecture, Edited by Laura Allen and Luke Caspar Pearson, Bartlett University Press 2016.

 
Harold Lloyd in Safety last! 1923 scene from Christian Marclay’s The Clock

Harold Lloyd in Safety last! 1923 scene from Christian Marclay’s The Clock

TIME TRAVELLER

Tutor: Ying-Lan Dann & Liz Lambrou
Schedule: Thusday 9:00 - 12:00 + 13:00 - 16:00
Location: 100.05.005

SUMMARY

Emerging out of the Design Week 2019 framing question “How can design shape the future?”, this 2nd and 3rd year design studio asks you to consider notions of past-present-future, with the objective of interrogating the view that time is one-directional.

“What would be the biological reality of planet earth rotating once every eighteen hours instead of twenty-four? That’s the fictional proposition of The Clock. You have less time, but you have more days in the year. So there’s a sense of losing something, and also gaining something. With an 18-hour clock, there’s a lot more yesterdays.” - Stuart Ringholt, 2013

Time is, a precondition of matter’s emergence” (Grosz, 2004)

In 1962, during a 15-day expedition, French geologist Michel Siffre, discovered that his profession as a geologist had broader implications - time. He placed himself in a cave for two months and became the subject of his own experimental time travel. Siffre enacted what Elizabeth Grosz would later write, that “Time is, a precondition of matter’s emergence” (Grosz, 2004)

Time traveller will be structured through a critique and re-organisation of the usual 14 week semester, which emphasises the mid and final semester mile-stones, instead encouraging you to study duration, through a fundamental re-thinking of the studio format.

You will be responding to the site between ACMI and The Capitol Theatre, which is currently being subjected to incredible change. During your travels in time, you will be asked to pinpoint sites and technologies of durational interest/complexity. You will adopt techniques of temporal interior making/documenting (eg: digging, film making, endurance activities) and develop a range of projects that speculate upon a non-linear time, locating ‘present’ as the slippery state in-between.

You will also be asked to look closely at innovations, artists and writers of time travel, such as Greenwich mean time, Michel Siffre, Christian Marcaly, Stuart Ringholt, Paul Virilio, Elizabeth Grosz, Eleanor Seuss, and many others.

Following Open 10 am daily, a Design Studio led by Liz Lambrou and Roger Kemp in 2018, ACMI has extended another invitation for RMIT Interior Design students to present their projects within their work-space ACMI X.

Time Traveller (Design 30%)

Time traveller will be delivered through a cyclic structure, in which students will undertake a 14 week ‘major design project’ (30% mark). This project also titled ‘Time Traveller’ will be issued in Week One and presented incrementally, at timepoints 01, 02, 03 and 04. This project will also be assessed in a non-conventional mode, with marks assigned at the start and re-calibrated at each time point. The function of this project will be to re-wire student’s perceptions of both linear time and the linear nature of a design studio.

Insta-mediacy (Design 30%)

“The Web is their classroom, Facebook is their community, the world is their study group. . . if universities won’t adapt, students will do it without them ((Ashwin Ram, Blog, April 26, 2010).

Students will produce a series of daily responses to a specific site condition/material detail. As a group of images, these will form a pictorial record, collected over time, to be presented at ACMI, in the aftermath of the screening of ‘The Clock’, by Christian Marclay.

Students will also undertake a range of gallery visits and prepare Instagram reviews.

Technology Summary

Timepieces
Students will conduct an exploratory-led process of investigations that will respond to time, time increments, duration and sequence through; Physical site analysis and intervention, drawing and making workshops, Notation mapping + diagrams, modeling time devices, undertaking endurance works. These timepieces have limited functional value, rather they’re are intended to support a re-thinking of linear time and privileging of the notion of the present.

Student Capabilities

Students will learn through the  following activities and approaches:

Ability to participate in and reflect upon temporal conditions
Ability to critically examine and synthesise precedents
Gain experience in creative modes of site-analysis.
Ability to research and catalogue a physical site and its contexts through photography/video/drawing/diagram/making/processing/editing and installation
Ability to process tangible and intangible spatial complexities through designed physical works and speculative spatial outcomes
Ability to effectively and creatively communicate observations and intent
Processes of transformation and transference through analysis, reflection, remaking & representations.
Ability to practice independent ideas through a range of explorative, experimental and speculative approaches to design

Key Terms

Questioning conventional linear notions of time.
Movement /motion/ duration / time /timeline/ sequence/ passage/increment
Shift / boundary / threshold/ moment/ action
Condition/ sets of relationships + exchange
Program/ context / usage/ ownership

Texts, Readings, Essays

Look
Daniel Crooks
Eleanor Suess
Greg More,
http://www.oomcreative.com/
Jorinde Voigt
Iannis Xenakis,
https://issuu.com/drawingcenter/docs/drawingpapers88_xenakis
Tacita Dean
Tehching Hsieh, One Year Performance 1980-1981
Stuart Ringholt, “The Clock”
Eadweard Muybridge,
Christian Marclay, Clock 2013
On Kawara, “Date Paintings”,
Felix Gonzalez-Torres 1991, “Untitled”

Visit
Daniel Von Sturmer, Cataract, 2 February 2019 – 23 March 2019, Anna Schwartz Gallery
Christian Marclay: The Clock, ACMI

Listen to
Iannis Xenakis, Marco Fusinato, John Cage, Jordan Lacey, Geoff Robinson

Read
Safont-Tria, Jordi, Kwinter, Sanford., & Holl, Steven. (2012). Steven Holl: Color, light, time. Zurich: Lars Müller Publisher.
Eloise Ross"What's the time?"Experimenting with cinematic temporality in The Clock
Natasha Ginwala, Daniel Muzyczuk (Eds.), The Museum of Rhythm
Grosz, E, “The Nick of Time”
Architecture from the Outside. Essays on Virtual and Real Space, Writing Architecture Series (Massachusetts: MIT, 2001). xix.
http://intermsofperformance.site/keywords/duration/andre-lepecki
http://intermsofperformance.site/keywords/score/carlos-basualdo
Pallasmaa, Juhani. The eyes of the skin: architecture and the senses. John Wiley & Sons, 2012


 
The Temptation of the Diagram by Matthew Richie

The Temptation of the Diagram by Matthew Richie

ABACUS: INTER-RELATIONAL DIAGRAMS  

Tutor: Hannah Moriarty with Suzie Attiwill and Ying-Lan Dann
Schedule: Tuesday 9:00 -12:00 + 13:00 - 16:00
Location: Morning 100.05.006, Afternoon 100.06.004
Partner Studio: Abacus Learning Centre

SUMMARY

Abacus Learning Centre is a not-for-profit organisation offering centre-based Applied Behavioural Analysis (ABA) therapy for children on the Autism spectrum. Abacus Learning Centre began in 2008 by a team of parents and supporters who had a vision to provide early intervention therapy for children on the Mornington Peninsula. The Abacus Learning Centre, in Hastings, Victoria, provides individualised ABA programs in schools across the Mornington Peninsula and Frankston, they also provide pre-school and school integration services for their students. ABA aims to reduce and moderate behaviours including speech and language, social skills, communication skills, adaptive living skills, and play skills.

Abacus: Inter~relational diagrams is a partnered studio with Abacus which encourages students to consider a more inclusive approach towards interior design. This will be explored through interior strategies such as sightlines, wayfinding and site analysis to establish spatial and social inter~relationships through the perspective of a child on the Autism spectrum. Students will be introduced to the ABA approach to teaching children from early intervention, and how the therapy moderates behaviour of the children. Through this relational interrogation of space, we can develop dynamic strategies and relational propositions for Abacus to use in the design process of their new purpose built centre.

Students will undertake experimental diagramming, and graphic taxonomy, with focus on the ABA method and the existing relations within the centre. This will enable a richer understanding of the necessary infrastructure that is required to support ABA therapy for children with ASD. There will be two site visits to the Abacus Learning Centre, allowing students the opportunity to be part of a live project, where they will gain experience working for a real client. The site visit encourages observation and analysis of current relational situations within the Abacus environment. Students will be required to respond collaboratively with strategic design proposals through mappings, notation and graphic documentation.

Students will engage with theoretical and academic concepts through reading and responding to relevant material, accompanied by weekly guests and site visits. This allows students to gain knowledge and experience in ASD, healthcare design and early education.

This may take the form of hyper-sensitivity, or hypo-sensitivity, in its various degrees and across the scope of all the senses, leaving individuals with autism with an altered sensitivity to touch, sounds, smell, light, colour, texture etc. In other words, this leaves them with an altered sense of the world around them. - Magda Mostafa

How do we observe and document relational / temporal encounters within space?

How do we translate spatial knowledge?

What is a diagram?

How can a diagram become a tool for translation and design for spatial experience?

How do we design for the unique individual and special population?

Technology Summary

How do we communicate design ideas to design-typicals (non-designers)?
The technology component of this studio will explore the most effective ways of learning from the ASD community: students / carers / therapists / parents etc., extracting this information, then translating it into design research in the form of relational / graphic diagrams. The students will need to find a suitable and comprehensive mode of communicating their design research and schematic diagramming to the client and ASD community.

Student Capabilities

Ability to engage sensitively and creatively with the ASD community
Ability to research and respond to theoretical + academic concepts , as well as precedent practices
Ability to use diagrammatic techniques as an interior research and translation tool
Ability to explore 2 + 3 dimensional drawing and image making to understand temporal, environmental and spatial relationships
Ability to engage with site and explore relations through observation and production
Ability to engage in critique of one's own work through panel discussion and in class workshops
Ability to communicate research through visual and graphic documents
Respond, research and design in response to a specific brief
Ability to effectively communicate a series of design concepts visually and verbally to the client.

Key Terms 

Applied Behavioural Analysis (ABA) / ASD/ Affordance / Ecological / Neurodiversity / Spatial / Environment Prosthetic / Translation / Diagram / Relation / Arrangement / Reciprocal Relationships / Heuristic / Discovery / Mise-en-scène / Viewpoints / Sitelines / Manipulation / Production / Site / Sight / Encounter / Routine / Predictability / Taxonomy / Collage / Notation

Site visit*

Abacus Learning Centre, Hastings.

*You will be required to visit the Abacus Learning Centre in Hastings for two full day (6hr) Studio sessions.

Precedents / References

Mary Featherston
Bernard Tschumi
Matthew Richie
Mike Kelley
Saana
Tomas Saraceno
Megan Rooney
Wolfgang Voegele
Jahnne Pasco-White
Mathieu Lehanneur
Nubo, Sydney
Sol Lewitt
Bianca Hester
Ana KrašIannis
Iannis Xenakis
Junya Ishigami
Hannah Darboven
Peter Eisenman
Berhard Tschumi
Jorinde Vogit
Tom Marioni

Texts, Readings, Essays

Anous, D. I. H. I. (2015). "The impact of Interior Design in educational spaces for children with Autism." American International Journal of Research in Humanities, Arts and Social Sciences.
Atmodiwirjo, P. (2014). "Space Affordances, Adaptive Responses and Sensory Integration by Autistic Children." International Journal of Design 8(3).
Ayres, A.J. (1979). “Sensory integration and the child”. Los Angeles: Western Psychological Services.
Doctoroff, S. (2001). "Adapting the Physical Environment to Meet the Needs of All Young Children for Play." Early Childhood Education Journal Vol. 29(No. 2, Winter).
Featherston M https://www.featherston.com.au/
Hart, B. (2014). "Autism parents & neurodiversity: Radical translation, joint embodiment and the prosthetic environment." BioSocieties 9(3): 284-303.
Kanner, L. (1943). “Autistic disturbances of affective contact”. Nervous Child, 2, 217-250. http://neurodiversity.com/library_kanner_1943.html
Lappé, M. (2014). “Taking care: Anticipation, extraction and the politics of temporality in autism science”, BioSocieties 9(3):304-328.
Martin, C. S. (2016). "Exploring the impact of the design of the physical classroom environment on young children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD)." Journal of Research in Special Educational Needs 16(4): 280-298.
McAllister, K. and B. Maguire (2012). "A design model: the Autism Spectrum Disorder Classroom Design Kit." British Journal of Special Education 39(4): 201-208.
Mostafa, M. (2008). "An Architecture for Autism: Concepts of Design Intervention for the Autistic User." IJAR vol. 2(Issue 1).
Mostafa, M. (2013). "Expanding Normal: Towards a More Inclusive Approach to Designing the Built Environment." Open House International 38(1): 4-6.
Mostafa, M. (2014). "Architecture For Autism: Autism Aspectss In School Design." International Journal of Architectural Research 8(1): 143-158.
Reszka, S. S., S. L. Odom and K. A. Hume (2012). "Ecological Features of Preschools and the Social Engagement of Children with Autism." Journal of Early Intervention 34(1): 40-56.
Silberman, S. a. (2015). Neurotribes : the legacy of autism and the future of neurodiversity. New York, Avery, an imprint of Penguin Random House.
Smith, D. J. (2009). "Spatial design as a facilitator for people with less visible impairments." Australasian Medical Journal 1(13): 220-227.
Tuan, Yi-fu (1977). Space and place: the perspective of experience. University of Minnesota Press, Minneapolis.

 
Hartmut Bohm, Untitled

Hartmut Bohm, Untitled

A MOVEABLE FEAST

Tutor: Karina Piper
Schedule: Tuesday 9:00 - 12:00 + 13:00 - 16:00
Location: Morning 100.05.007, Afternoon 100.06.006

SUMMARY

The hospitality industry is constantly changing – how can a place essentially created for eating, drinking, socialising and entertaining, be renewed or altered again and again and why does it need to be?
Throughout the semester, we will explore an isolated site that changes with the seasons; we will interpret the cultural and social trends of potential patrons/visitors (communities and individuals); and ultimately question what it might be to design a space - built and natural, interior and exterior, temporary and permanent - that embraces these concepts. This is an opportunity for hospitality to be so much more than a focus on designing with practicalities, codes / regulations or food / beverage (though we will lean into all of these elements too); it’s a chance to really unravel what it means to create place for community, connection, program, natural environment, sensory experience, permanent and / or transient space.
The selected site is physically and naturally evolving (an outdoor area directly open to the elements) and we will explore how, given this context, design can sometimes be fleeting / temporary / dying / living / thriving / giving / ever evolving / adapting / resourceful / accidental.
To help us determine what the brief needs to be, we will try to predict change or future patterns with popular trends in culture and design, setting an enquiry into how hospitality can facilitate positive, negative and neutral human experiences.
The subject site is Herring island, Melbourne. Selected specifically because of it’s physical disconnection with surrounding Melbourne, this island promotes an investigation of changing seasons, flora and fauna, history, preservation, questions concerning cultural and social value, art, isolation and connection.

Key Questions

How and why is the hospitality industry ever-evolving?
Who cares about hospitality?
What’s the difference between service and hospitality?
Does good service stay in your mind? Could you recognise it if you saw it?
How do we create place whilst embracing inevitable change?
How do we graphically represent our investigations and findings and then interpret it to Architecture and Interiors?

Technology Summary

This studio will primarily focus on creating and designing via a hands-on experience, encouraging and promoting hand sketches, collages, vignettes, model making, stop motion, mapping, photography, graphic design, colour, pattern, texture….any form of physical and tactile media.
The first part of the semester will be based around research and reflective studies, which will include local venue site visits and interpretation of some of the references provided. The final body of work will be to design a space, place, experience or other, that encapsulates and explores hospitality through both a practical design and experimental / poetic lens.

Student Capabilities 

Students will learn through following activities and approaches:
Graphic communication, exploring mixed media, a “making process”
Topographical interpretation and exploration
Historical research of site and surrounding context
Critical thinking and analysis of the hospitality industry
Cultural and social anthropological enquiry
Constructive criticism of your own work, processes and methods, as well as effective, collaborative feedback for peers
Ability to contribute to a group / class setting and consider opposing theories during class discussions
Knowledge of Hospitality concepts, including a practical application of interior design
Regular verbal communication and presentation practice

Key Terms

Experience / Think / Create / Communicate
Explore / Analyse / Interpret
Fast / Slow / Stay / Leave

Precedents / References

Site / Architecture / Natural environment / Place making:
Herring Island
Serpentine Pavilion, Junya Ishigami
Reflective houses, Autumn de Wilde
Skum, BIG Architects
MORI building digital art museum, Tokyo
Kengo Kuma
Forest Pavilion, nArchitects
A Forest where Gods live, TeamLabFilms / Documentary / Readings:
Dave Chappelle’s Block Party
Burning Man
Fyre Island, 2019
Into the Wild, 2007
Heston Blumenthol TV series
Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory circa 1971

Art / Design / Graphic communication:
Sculpture, Richard Serra
Hartmut Bohm
Window, Jeannie Baker
William Kentridge
Bow Wow Atelier
The Wes Anderson Collection
Topologies, Maja Lin

 
Luxton, Claire (2016) Beauty Fine Art Photography. URL  https://photogrist.com/beauty-fine-art-photography-claire-luxton/

Luxton, Claire (2016) Beauty Fine Art Photography. URL https://photogrist.com/beauty-fine-art-photography-claire-luxton/

VERTICAL WELLNESS: DESIGNING FOR FUTURE URBAN LIVING

Tutor: Emma Nunan & Michael Rafferty (Elenberg Fraser)
Schedule: Thursday 9:00 - 12:00 + 13:00 - 16:00
Location: 100.05.004B

SUMMARY

Melbourne’s CBD residential population is rapidly increasing each year. The City of Melbourne has forecast that by 2036 its population will have nearly doubled to reach 263,000 residents. The demand for high-rise living developments will continue and long term thinking and planning will need to take place.
Vertical Wellness is an interior design studio that focusses on designing a collective of interior spaces within a residential development that sustainably impacts the health and wellbeing of a resident in an urban context.
Our role as designers is to ensure that when crafting the interior spaces for these buildings, we consider its impact on the residents’ health and wellbeing. The environmental quality and life span of an individual living in an urban context is known to be lesser than an individual living in the country. The studio explores the positive impact that planning, research and design can have on the residents’ quality of life when living in this type of interior environment. The studio will also hold a key focus on how we can broaden our thinking so that our buildings operate like a vertical living environment where the habitat and the balance of life are aligned. Taking influence from the human body and nature, strategies can be implemented to create new ways of living and broaden our understanding of what is a ‘home’ in an urban context. The studio educates students on the importance of the interior designers role and how the design of such interior spaces can affect & influence peoples experience, health and wellbeing.
The first component to the studio will involve a series of research investigations that will establish how people are living today and how we envisage this will evolve to create a sustainable future living model. The studio will educate students on new ways of thinking, planning and designing with holistic intent in this high-rise urban context.
Following this, students will be given a site in the CBD where these new ways of thinking can be tested to produce a new future living model in a specific context. This studio aims to develop a refined common area interior space that responds to initial investigation.

Key Questions

What are the positive and negative health and wellbeing outcomes for residents that live in high-rise urban living environments today? What can we do to improve these environments for residents in the future?
What design strategies can we implement into an interior to create a space that allows residents to refuel and rejuvenate themselves?
What spaces may be included in the common area amenities of a residential building? Consider the relationships of these spaces.
How can technology and design assist in establishing and maintaining social connections between residents within the building?
How does research and process affect the interior design of a space?

Technology Summary

The technology component of the studio is broken down across #research, #process and #design.

Research: Students will learn ways of processing and communicating the information gathered into a series of outputs that include drawing, mapping, diagramming and photography. Students may choose to utilise software packages including Adobe InDesign or Illustrator to complete this phase. Alternatively, this phase may be undertaken by other mediums including hand sketch, painting or physical representations.
Process: Students will be given a site in the CBD where they will begin exploring new ways of thinking, planning and formulating a new future living model. Students will be expected to use a wide range of media to communicate their conceptual thinking and their design process into a series of outcomes. Students may choose to utilise software packages including InDesign, Illustrator, Revit, AutoCAD or Rhino to complete this phase. Students are not limited to the use of these tools to complete this phase.
Design: Students will learn how to plan and design spaces within the building along with developing some unique details of a particular space of the student’s choice. Students may choose to utilise software packages including InDesign, Illustrator, Revit, AutoCAD or Rhino to complete this phase. Students are not limited to the use of these tools to complete this phase.
Folio: Students will learn the art of book binding to create a folio of their work that compliments and enhances the communication their final project.

Student Capabilities 

Ability to collate and analyse current and future typological trends data
Ability to undertake site analysis to inform a design response that is sensitive to its context
Ability to prepare and develop a conceptual thinking towards a final response
Ability to prepare and present thinking through clear and legible graphics. This may entail drawings, diagrams or photographic montages.

Key Terms 

Community; Future Living; Sustainability; Green Living; Vertical Wellness; Experience; Amenity; Health; Wellbeing; Common Spaces; Public Space; Immersive; Beauty; Nutrition; Fitness; Technology; Demographics; Future Trends; Social Interaction / Connection; Tactility; Circadian Rhythms; Spatial Planning; Natural Materiality; Circulation ...

Texts and Readings 

Littlefield, David (Ed.) (2008) Metric Handbook: Planning and Design Data, Third Edition; Architectural Press
Better Apartment Design Standards, State Government of Victoria DELWP, URL https://www.planning.vic.gov.au/policy-and-strategy/planning-reform/better-apartments
Matério (2007) Material World 2: Innovative Materials for Architecture and Design; Birkhauser
Friedman, Avi (2017) Multifamily Housing: Creating a Community; Images Publishing Group Pty Ltd
Henry, Steven (Ed.) & Wood, Anthony (Ed.) (2018) CTBUH Tall Buildings + Urban Habitat, Volume 1; Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat
Klanten, Robert (Ed.), Bolkofer, K (Ed.) & Meyer, B. (Ed.) (2011) Sublime: New Design and Architecture from Japan, Gestalten
Klanten, Robert (Ed.) (2010) Data Flow 2: Visualizing Information in Graphic Design; Gestalten

 
A Published Event,  Fall, Now a River,  Glenorchy Art and Sculpture Park, 2016.

A Published Event, Fall, Now a River, Glenorchy Art and Sculpture Park, 2016.

REWRITING THE READING ROOM

Tutor: Fayen d’Evie & Katie West
Schedule: Tuesday 9:00 - 12:00 + 13:00 - 16:00
Location: Morning 100.05.003, Afternoon 100.05.004B

SUMMARY

Rewriting the Reading Room challenges concepts of authoring, reading, texts, language, communication, typography, and publishing to generate designs for experiential and speculative reading rooms. We will discuss how reading rooms may operate outdoors, exploring what it is to read country, to read by walking water bodies, to read histories by embodying texts. We will consider the design of ephemeral, mobile, and episodic reading rooms. We will explore the political and discursive potential of a reading room, and implications for conceptualizing interiority. We will investigate tactile texts through blindness and gestural texts through Deafness, and generate designs that expand the perceptual scope of a reading room. We will draw on xenolinguistics to imagine the design of reading rooms for a post-human future. We will consider the design of reading rooms capable of sustaining the reading of texts over deep time. We will consider the interior space of a book. We will experiment with ways that a creative and critical practice of publishing can deepen interior design thinking, where publication is conceived broadly, not only encompassing printed matter, but also audio texts, video texts, objects, sculptural installation, performative publication, and scores for reading.  

During the early part of the semester, we will prioritise reflecting on interiority and generating interior designs through experiments in writing and publishing, via weekly briefs.  At mid-semester review, students will propose the contours of an independent interior design project, which will extend one or more of the writing approaches to generate a design for an experiential or speculative reading room. In the latter part of the semester, students will be mentored to develop this project and to share the outcomes in publication form. The final assessment will include presentation of the publication, including physical and digital versions and a score for reading.

Key Questions

What normative assumptions are embedded in the design of conventional libraries, archives and reading rooms?
How can the design of reading rooms challenge normative biases towards ways of knowing and reading?
How can the design of reading rooms, libraries and archives proceed from, and foster, Indigenous ways of knowing and reading?
How can we understand interiority where reading occurs in an outdoors setting?
How can the design of reading rooms, libraries and archives respond to the texts, languages, and modes of perception and communication of authors and readers with blindness, deafness, or other non-normative embodiments?
How can the design of reading rooms offer ethical, political or activist positions?
How can the design of reading rooms introduce new propositions for conversation amongst readers?
How can writing and publishing offer creative contexts for generating, developing and sharing propositions for interior design?

Technology Summary

The studio will introduce a design process that draws on methods of writing, reading, and publishing. We will situate briefs by experimenting with varied approaches to reading including: reading country, myopic reading, solo reading, collective reading, embodied reading, episodic reading. We will generate interior design concepts through sensorial description, fiction, writing movement, ekphrasis, collage poetics, creative interview, collective description, and dialogue. We will draw on techniques from writers’ workshops to elicit feedback on design concepts. We will deepen, refine and present interior design propositions through publishing, including the design of printed matter, audio and video texts, performative oration, and sculptural installation. We will extend drawing, mapping and diagramming skills. Students may develop Adobe Photoshop, Audition, Premiere and Indesign skills to experiment with printed and audiovisual publications. We will activate critical conversation about the design propositions and their contribution to interior thinking through close reading and other methods adapted from reading groups.

Student Capabilities

Ability to critically analyse assumptions around ways of knowing, perception, language, communication, that affect interior relationships, or are coded into interior design propositions.
Ability to experiment with writing as a method of analysing interior relationships and generating interior designs.
Ability to engage in constructive peer feedback to develop individual or collaborative designs.
Ability to refine designs in response to feedback.
Ability to communicate design concepts through printed matter, audiovideo texts, oratory presentations, and installation.in key theorists

Key Terms

Language, perception, communication
Text, typology, orthography, etymology
Authoring, publishing, reading, listening, conversation
More-than-human, ecology, custodianship
Complex embodiment, blindness, Deafness
Sensory, kinaesthetic, tactile, gestural

Texts and Readings

Elliman. Paul. 1998. “My Typographies”. Eye Magazine. 27. http://t-y-p-o-g-r-a-p-h-y.org/MEDIA/PDF/MyTypographies.pdf
Arabena, Kerry. 2006. “The Universal Citizen: an Indigenous citizenship framework for the twenty-first century”, Australian Aboriginal Studies, 2, 36-46.
Bawaka country, et. Al. “Co-becoming Bawaka: Towards a relational understanding of place/space”. Progress in Human Geography, Vol 40(4), 455-475.
www.walkingLab.org
Howe, Susan. 2014. Spontaneous Particulars: The Telepathy of Archives. New York: New Directions.
Psaltis, Alice-Anne, ‘Systems of Power: Richard Bell’s Aboriginal Tent Embassy’, Runway, 33.
Palmer, Daniel. 2015. Against Accommodation: Park MacArthur, Mousse, 47.
Downey Chris. 2013. Design with the Blind in Mind. TedX. https://www.ted.com/talks/chris_downey_design_with_the_blind_in_mind?language=en
Ridloff, Douglas. Deaf Poets Society. TEDX.  https://youtu.be/0LZGYwDO-QE
Wells-Jensen, Sheri et al. 2019. Douglas Vakoch (ed.) (Forthcoming). Alternative Perceptual Systems and Discovery of Basic Astronomical Phenomena.
Bervin, Jen. 2017. Silk Poems. New York: Nightboat
Gregory, Hannah. 2015. ‘Interview with Moyra Davey’, The White Review, May 2015. http://www.thewhitereview.org/feature/interview-with-moyra-davey/
Gilbert, Annette. (Ed.) 2016. Publishing as Artistic Practice, Berlin: Sternberg Press

Precedents / References

A Published Event (especially ‘The People’s Library’ and ‘Fall of the Derwent’)
Heman Chong
Richard Bell (especially ‘Embassy’)
Dora Garcia Lopez
Kimsooja
Guy de Cointet
Irene Haiduk
Jorge Luis Borges (especially the Library of Babel)
‘Aer Nullius’, Blakdot, by Katie West
Footnotes’, 3rd Ural Industrial Biennial, by 3-ply
‘Cosmic Static’, Ian Potter Museum of Art, by Jen Bervin, Fayen d’Evie, Bryan Phillips, Andy Slater.
Burrup Peninsula, Pilbara, WA
Preminghana, Tasmania
Lighthouse for the Blind, San Francisco
Abbey Library of St Gall, Switzerland
Morgan Library and Museum, New York
Reading Room, Beinecke Rare Books and Manuscript Library, Yale

 
Image author unknown

Image author unknown

RADICAL CUBBY-HOUSE

Tutor: Tai Snaith & Bryan Spier
Schedule: Tuesday 9:00 - 12:00 + 13:00 - 16:00
Location: Siteworks

SUMMARY

Radical Cubby-House takes children’s imaginative play and cubby house building as a model to explore fantastical, utopian, and impossible design ideas. It takes its cue from children’s play, children’s television programs and theatre, box wars, and speculative architecture. The course will encourage wild speculation and unfettered play with interior possibilities, by focusing on provisional construction with cheap and scavenged materials augmented by imaginative description and storytelling. Students will collaborate to construct person-sized shelters made from cardboard boxes, paper, bed sheets, found objects, or just pure thought. The studio is designed to be fun, but this will be counterbalanced by a consideration of the social and psychological implications of each project.

Key Questions

Can children’s play serve as a model for serious interior design?
What if you could design interiors without fear and without boundaries?
Can the work of design be augmented or even replaced by imaginative play?
How do groups negotiate creative and imaginative decisions?
How can radical and boundless interior design make a social impact, and address challenges in the community and environment?

Technology Summary

Radical Cubby-House will emphasise the role of imagination and thought experimentation, and encourage students to regard these as tools for boundless design and construction. Students will discover strategies to access their imagination, to speculatively manipulate ideas, and to realise what they find in the form of documentations, and propositional interiors. Projects will take the form of D.I.Y constructions from cheap and scavenged materials, make-believe play, games, and the use of storytelling and description to illustrate imaginative content. Students will be challenged to be bold and experimental to realise their ideas as person-sized interiors, and to situate their designs within an expanded imaginative context of their own construction. Students will work collaboratively on projects and so will be required to identify and delegate tasks, and also work to a budget and timeframe. In addition students will be urged to address social and political context, and aspire to mitigate or transform social challenges by the design of radical interior spaces.

Student Capabilities 

Imaginative visualisation
Thought experimentation
Propositional construction
Three dimensional drawing/ collage
Designing to solve social challenges
Collaboration
Documentation
Project management

Key Terms

Play / Fun/ Imagination / Thought experiments / Make-believe / Make-do / Speculation / D.I.Y / Provisional / Propositional / Temporary / Collaboration / Fantasy / Utopia / Pretend / Impossible / Impractical

Precedents / References 

Playschool / Mr Squiggle / Constant Nieuwenhuys / Yo Gabba Gabba / Terunobu Fujimori / Box Wars / Mikala Dwyer / Dada Theatre / The Curiosity Show / Verner Panton / Alexander Girard / Kurt Schwitters / Yoshitomo Nara / Alexander Calder

Texts and References

Speculative everything : Design, fiction, and social dreaming. Anthony Dunne & Fiona Raby. (2013). The MIT Press. Play Anything: The Pleasure of Limits, the Uses of Boredom, and the Secret of Games. Ian Bogost (2016). Basic Books. Homo ludens : A study of the play-element in culture. Johan Huizinga (1949). Routledge. Wonderland: How Play Made The Modern World. Steven Johnson (2016). Riverhead Books DIY utopia : Cultural imagination and the remaking of the possible. Amber. Day. (2017). Lexington Books. Alexander Girard: designer, artist. Todd Oldham & Kiera Coffee. (2011). AMMO. Calder's Circus. Alexander Calder (1972). Dutton. Pretend play in childhood : Foundation of adult creativity Russ, S. (2014). American Psychological Association. Build your own playground! A sourcebook of play sculptures, designs, and concepts from the work of Jay Beckwith. Jeremy Joan Hewes & Jay Beckwith. (1974). Houghton Mifflin. The Activist Drawing : Retracing Situationist Architectures from Constant's New Babylon to beyond. Mark Wigley, Catherine de Zegher. (2001). MIT Press. The collaborative construction of pretend : Social pretend play functions. Carollee Howes, Olivia Unger & Catherine C Matheson. (1992). (SUNY series, children's play in society). State University of New York Press.

 

 
Flexible Dwelling: Two Pavilion House, Kirsty Voltz & David Toussant

Flexible Dwelling: Two Pavilion House, Kirsty Voltz & David Toussant

DWELLING STATE

Tutor: Kate Corke
Schedule: Thursday 9:00 - 12:00 + 13:00 - 16:00
Location: Morning 100.06.006

SUMMARY

Through a series of initial micro investigation, the students in studio Dwelling State will deconstruct a series of Australian dwellings. Dissecting each part of each site – room by room, piece by piece, place by place, brick by brick. These investigations will generate a personal kit of parts (an individual concept) for each student; which will be made up of elements they believe essential to a dwelling - ideologies, memories, associations, environments, character, social, emotional and urban factors as well as craft and materials that represented a traditional Australian dwelling.
This kit of parts (concept) will be the tools each student use to reconstruct an Australian dwelling for their chosen client. The students will apply their kit of parts / own informed concept of future living needs in Australia to their final project of designing an Australian dwelling of the future.
The final project will represent a dwelling which may come in any shape or form, it may contain or be contained by interior qualities, it may be movable, operable, dispensable and external. At its core the dwelling will be driven by design not regulations, and should be designed to easily adjust to the evolving lifestyle of the inhabitant, in Australia’s changing urban environment.
The initial weeks of the semester will be an exploratory-led process creating a kit of parts. This kit of parts will be expressed and presented as a series of refined, provocative images that clearly show each students concept.
The second part of the semester will focus on an individual project designing a dwelling. The students will use their images and concept from the first part of the semester, to create an ongoing narrative into the final project and as a point of reference as to where the project originated.
The projects will reflect each students position on future living needs in Australia, students will have examined complex cultural and political issues, as well as used creative and critical thinking to develop the project.

Key Questions

What does it mean to dwell?
Where can we dwell?
Is a dwelling static? Or can it move?
What role does time play in the evolution of the dwelling?
Do the essential parts of a traditional dwelling need to remain? Do room associations need to exist ie. Does a living room need to remain only for ‘living’?
Does the home need all the parts that it is composed of? Can it be stripped down to its essential parts?
Do walls have to be shifted, added, cut out, distorted?
What does the housing makeup look like in future Australia dwellings?
Does a home need a greater purpose?
Does a home need a certain amount of space?
Should dwellings generate revenue from its garden? Kitchen? Tools?
How can we use dwellings more efficiently?
What role does the building character play?

Technology Summary

The research and findings will be presented in a ‘kit of parts’ which will be presented through a series of images (minimum 5 images). Students will be assessed on their ability to produce provocative imagery, that clearly represent an idea, element or narrative.
The series of images can be executed in any possible medium, that clearly communicates the ideologies formed in these exercises.
The images could be, but not limited to, Collage, Mixed Media, Digital representations, Photography, Hand drawing, Photography or Model Making.
Whatever medium the student chooses needs to be consistent across all images, and each final image needs to have a series of development images behind it, showing skill development. The development needs to be collected into a folio.  
The final project will need to communicate both a concept, and a project demonstrating how the developed concept / kit of parts / idea can be executed in a dwelling state.
The final project can be produced in any medium, however needs to clearly show how the kit of parts is the key conceptual drivers for the final outcome. The final project needs to show overall site diagrams, conceptual imagery, as well as detailed plans and sections. Each student will need to highly detail one element of their dwelling.

The final outcome will need to show the full semester work.

  1. The Initial research and findings – mappings, diagrams, collage in the form of am folio

  2. The ‘Kit of Parts’ A Series of minimum 5 images

  3. How the ‘Kit of Parts’ was used as tools to develop a series of potential design outcomes in the form of a folio

  4. Final project – A design outcome and clearly defined ideology. This final outcome can be produced using any technique that is most appropriate to the project, however must include a room, object, or space that is highly detailed that helps communicate overall idea. As well as plans / sections and site diagrams.

Student Capabilities 

Ability to engage with architectural structures to reimagine their spatial potentials and flexibility
Ability to effectively communicate a series of design concepts through image making Ability to collect/ document/ observe, and present these observations and creative perceptions through various techniques
Ability to explore the concept of dwelling/home/habitation through research into precedents and references
Ability to engage critically and creatively with complex cultural and political issues
Ability to engage with theoretical concepts through reading and responding to certain key theorists
Ability to explore specific, contemporary and futuristic ideologies and their relation to interior practice
Ability to explore making, drawing, collage and image making as a form of effective communication
Ability to respond, research and design in response to a specific brief
Ability to achieve design outcomes based off individual research and ideologies Ability to refine a design through multiple iterations

Key Terms

Place, space, dwell, home, dynamic living spaces, flexible living, multi-generational, de- construction, representation, narrative, existing, being, Australia, history, context, process, utopian vs dystopian, environment, urban, nomad, family, redundant, dominant, intimacy, hidden, forbidden, essential

Key concepts:
Complex cultural issues within Australia
Being / Existing
Adaptation
Spatial arrangement
Architectural Flexibility

Precedents / References

Jan Gehl, The Human Scale (2012)
Friedman, A. (2002). The Adaptable House. New York: McGraw-Hill Companies.
Flexible Housing. Jeremy Till & Tatjana Schneider
Architecture and order. Approaches to social space. Michael Parker Pearson & Colin Richards
The Australian Ugliness, Robin Boyd 1960
Living in Motion: Design & Architecture for Fleixble Dwelling, Robert Kronenburg
Flexible: Architecture that responds to change, Robert Kronenburg
Holmes, Cecilia (2012) The Adaptable Dwelling Thesis Victoria University of Wellington
Rapoport, A. (1998). Using “ Culture” in Housing Design. Housing and Culture,
Bergson, Deleuze and the Becoming of Unbecoming, Elizabeth Grosz, Parallax, Volume 11, Number
Drawing Futures: Speculations in Contemporary Drawing for Art and Architecture
Koolhaas Houselife, Documentary from the Living Architectures series, 2013
Form and Structure: the Organisation of Interior Space, Graeme Broker and Sally Stone
Kruger, Corinne, and Nigel Cross. “Solution Driven Versus Problem Driven Design: Strategies and Outcomes.” Design Studies 27, no. 5 (2006): 527–548. Accessed November 15, 2015, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.destud.2006.01.001
Nigel Cross. (2007). Designerly Ways of Knowing (1 edition). Basel; London: Birkhäuser Architecture.
Pink, Sarah. Doing Sensory Ethnography. London, Thousand Oaks, CA: SAGE Publications Ltd., 2009.
Form and Structure: the Organisation of Interior Space, Graeme Broker and Sally Stone
Adaptive Reuse: Extending the Lives of Buildings - Liliane Wong

 
Innovative Interior (website image)

Innovative Interior (website image)

HYPE, DISRUPTION, AGILITY, GENIUS, FRESHNESS - WITHINNOVATION 

Tutor: Giselle Laming & Nick Rebstadt
Schedule: Tuesday 9:00 - 12:00 + 15:00 - 18:00
Location: Morning 100.06.003, Afternoon 100.05.003

SUMMARY

From TED Talks to seasonal fashion week’s globally, innovation is an often-used word in design. Those who practice design are constantly under the pressure to innovate – make something more efficient, enjoyable and new – and designers are constantly expected to produce the ‘new’, ‘exciting’, ‘efficient’ or ‘genius’ – words often used synonymously with ‘innovation.’
So, what is it? And is it an interior? Economist Joseph Schumpeter defines something innovative as putting ‘invention into the economy’ this definition assumes an already pre-existing set of conditions with which to work with, innovation here is a space. withinnovation is situated in the first Melbourne Innovation District, and through a process of ‘active’ designing students will critically engage with an officially declared site of ‘innovation’.
withinnovation proposes to interrogate notions and fetishizations of innovation with interior design, (both the capitalistic expectations of the discipline and also the pressure on designers to innovate in practice.)
The end result of the studio will be a major project actualised within the Melbourne Innovation District’s public spaces through a sensitive and ethical approach to public space design, that responds to the conditions and activity (spatial, relational, economic, physical aspirational) within the site. Students will learn how to develop and actualise a proposal, working collectively and with the conditions of the sites.
This studio critically reflects on ‘innovation’ and designing ‘innovatively’, inserting invention into the activity of the Melbourne Innovation District’s public spaces, provoking a vision for what the future of an ‘innovative’ city might be and an interior designer’s place in it.

Technology Summary

The technology in this studio is related to the technique of design and actualization (production) within the urban interior. Depending on the nature of the student’s final project, main technologies that are employed in the studio are:
Prototyping temporal interior designs – as quick iterative responses and finalized, actualized design proposals. Including, but not limited to:
Model making
Drawing
Performance
Sewing and other fabric and textile fabrications
Online media: sound, video, photography and website design
Map-making and publication design
Site-based experimentation
The development of instructional design for temporal urban events. Instructions can include but are not limited to:
Diagramming (graphic scores, annotated site diagrams, assembly instructions)
Sound and Video
Online instructions
Physical tutorials
Drawing and diagramming
Effective and ethical documentation of these interior designs through video, photography, drawing, writing and online media.  

Student Capabilities 

An understanding of ‘innovation’ and its relationship to contemporary interior design practices Understanding of the temporal nature of interior spaces
The ability to understand and harness the use of available technologies for interior making
Exploration of spatial program as device in interior design practice
Questioning of, and operation outside of traditional interior design project paradigms
Entrepreneurial potential of interior design practices
Exploration of the potential of political agency for the interior designer
The ability to collaborate as a group

Key Questions

What is ‘innovation’?
What’s ‘being innovative’?
How much can the designer (you) change your immediate space?
What is a ‘program’?
How can you identify and action opportunities and potentials for change?
How do you acquire the knowledge and agency to instigate change?
What is collective imagination? What can it do?
What is the lifespan of an interior?
How can networked technology be utilised to create interior designs?
Does the designer need to be present for their interior to be designed?
Is there emancipatory potential in designing with speed?
Instinctual / Analytical
What is intuition?
What makes a project?
What should can a designer do?


Key Terms

Innovation, Genius, New, Disruption, Boundlessness, Agility, Efficiency, Temporality, Now, Urban Interior, Possibility, Potency and Power, Actualisation, Future, Capitalism

Texts, Videos & Projects

The Site
Melbourne Innovation District: https://mid.org.au/
Participate Melbourne (Melbourne Innovation Districts): https://participate.melbourne.vic.gov.au/melbourne-innovation-districts?_ga=2.196337643.6195606.1550024524-5925151.1550024524
City of Melbourne: Melbourne Innovation Districts: https://www.melbourne.vic.gov.au/about-melbourne/melbourne-profile/smart-city/Pages/melbourne-innovation-districts.aspx

Texts
Suzie Attiwill. “Urban and Interior: techniques for an urban interiorist” In Urban Interior: informal explorations, interventions and occupations.
Marc Augé. “Innovaton” in The Future.
Sander Bax; Pascal Gielen & Bram Ieven (eds.). Interrupting the City: Artistic Constitutions of the Public Sphere.
Franco ‘Bifo’ Berardi. Futurability.
Franco ‘Bifo’ Berardi. The Soul At Work.
Boltanski, Luc. & Chiapello, Ève. “The Projective City” in The New Spirit of Capitalism. Verso, London: 2017
Dis Magazine: https://dis.art/
Gilles Deleuze. “Intuition as Method” in Bergsonism.
Gilles Deleuze & Félix Guattari. “How Do You Make Yourself a Body without Organs?” in A Thousand Plateaus.
Nico Dockx & Pascal Gielen (eds.). Mobile Autonomy: Artists Self-Organisation.
Adam Greenfield. Radical Technologies.
Chris Kraus. “Little Creatures” in Where Art Belongs.
Raunig, Gerald. “Seventeen Tendencies of the Modulation of Creativity.” In Factories of Knowledge Industries of Creativity.
Jeremy Rifkin. The Third Industrial Revolution. https://www.sbs.com.au/guide/video/1165831747733/The-Third-Industrial-Revolution
Irit Rogoff. FREE. https://www.e-flux.com/journal/14/61311/free/
rit Rogoff. The Ways We Work (talk) https://soundcloud.com/artspace-619083596/public-talk-irit- rogoff
Emily Singer. The Measured Life https://www.technologyreview.com/s/424390/the-measured-life/
Gary Wolf, The quantified self – TED: https://ed.ted.com/lessons/gary-wolf-the-quantified-self Workman, Jason. “Architecture on the Fringes of Legality: Santiago Cirugeda & Kyohei Sakaguchi”. In Un Magazine. vol. 5.2, 2011. http://unprojects.org.au/magazine/issues/issue-5- 2/architecture-on-the-fringes-of-legality/

Projects & Practices
Rojava Film Commune. Forms of Freedom, at State of Concept, Athens (2018-2019). Co-curators: Iliana Fokianaki & Rojava Film Commune. https://stateofconcept.org/exhibition/rojava- film-commune/
The B Team: http://www.bteam.org/
Rirkrit Tiravanija (Thailand). Untitled (Lunch Box) (1996) part of the NGV Collection: https://www.ngv.vic.gov.au/ exhibition/rirkrit-tiravanija/
Bernadette Corporation (USA). Everybody is on the Floor. (2009)
Anne Imhof (Austria). Faust (2017). Installation / performance at the German Pavilion at the 57th Venice Biennale.
Jeremy Deller (United Kingdom). The Battle of Orgreave Archive (An Injury to One is an Injury to All). (2001)
!Mediengruppe Bitnik (Switzerland). Opera Calling. (2007): https:// wwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwww.bitnik.org/o/
ASSEMBLE (United Kingdom) New Addington. Urban development strategy.
Bianca Hester (Australia). Please leave these windows open overnight to enable the fans to draw in cool air during the early hours of the morning. (2010)
Faye Toogood (United Kingdom).
Sarah Sze (United States). Triple Point (Planetarium) (2013)

 
Mervyn Skipper

Mervyn Skipper

LIVING SYSTEMS - AVOCADO ON TOAST AND THE SUBURBAN DREAM

Tutor: Raphael Kilpatrick
Schedule: Tuesday 9:00 - 12:00 + 13:00 - 16:00
Location: Morning 100.05.004B, Afternoon 100.05.006

SUMMARY

The end of the world is nigh? Or perhaps just the world as we know it? It can be difficult to see a possible future in light of the projected population growth, climate change and political instability. In 2100 the world will have almost doubled its human population and environmental conditions could displace over one billion of those people. To accomodate that growth we would need to build about 35 houses every minute, there could also be less rain, less arable land and compounding disasters. How could we possibly live in a world like that and what on earth does that have to do with Interior design?

Cities, in which 90% of Australians live, are complex and inter-reliant social, environmental, economic and political systems. The socio-spatial arrangement of these can determine everything from how healthy you are to whether you go to University. In other words, where you live can change your life. The network of interiors, in which we spend 90% of our lives, contribute to our ability to engage in society.  

In this design studio you will look at the spatial systems of Melbourne and explore how the suburbs, in their current state, might adapt to a predicted future. Through extensive reading and a reflective look at your current living conditions, wants and desires you will be required to rethink and adapt your life to a 2050 scenario. You will then be asked to consider how these ideas might come together to form a shared vision.

Despite Melbourne being the fastest growing city in Australia it faces an unlikely problem, loneliness. Social isolation has become a major health concern. This is largely impacted by where we choose, or are forced, to live. Loneliness leads to the loss of everyday social networks, shared norms, values and understandings that facilitate co-operation and reciprocity. Many of these attributes are in play when we require collective action to solve problems, like how to adapt to a rapidly growing population and changing climate.

There are spatial conditions that can contribute to these social networks being formed. Common bonds often occur through horizontal ties between individuals, within walking distances for example. So we will need to evolve our ideas of the “home” as domesticity and the familiar and see it instead as individual networks of interiors. Can these interiors become sites of agency rather than control and isolation? Can the “suburban dream” adapt and survive?

“the city is a massive aggregation of interior environments; our home, our workplaces, the restaurants and bars that we socialise in, our daycare services and schools, our doctors office. Those are the places where we dwell, learn, and become citizens and individuals” - Brendan Cormier

Technology Summary

You will be required to document, through site observation, drawing, mapping, diagramming, documentation the spatial, social, environmental and economic systems you engage with in your life. This will be expanded and supported through extensive reading and research into the possible future conditions of Melbourne in 2050. You will be required to develop a manifesto stating how you would like your living conditions to be in the future, your future.

These individual visions will then be negotiated as a group with a collective design for a “neighbourhood” in Melbourne. You will be required to work effectively as a group and develop components of a detailed design proposal positioning the interior within a complex system.

You will have to work as a group to rapidly test and work up design strategies and delegate shared tasks. You should be prepared to utilise existing skills such as hand drawing, photography, film, collage, model making and CAD.

Student Capabilities

An expanded analysis of ‘site’ with the understanding that it is a confluence of many interacting material and immaterial forces.
Forming an evidence based understanding of the future.
Ability to connect spatial design with social impact.
Articulating complex ideas verbally, graphically and spatially.
Working effectively as a community.
Ability to adapt to change through design iteration.

Key Terms

Resilience / Social Capital / Community / Civic Participation / Change / Agency / Housing / Suburbs / Systems Thinking / Adaptive Capacity / NIMBY / Equity / Climate Change / Population Growth / Housing Affordability / Meanwhile Design / Social Capital / Disobedience / Resilience

Precedents / References

Andrés Jaque - disobedient architecture
Alejandro Aravena - incremental housing
Neave Brown - social housing
Paul Karakusevic - social housing
Giorgos Kallis - degrowth and dematerialisation

Texts, Readings, Essays, Videos

Some notes towards an Interior Archipelago - Brendan Cormier, MONU Issue 21, 2014
Resilient Melbourne Strategy - Rockefeller Foundation 2016
Urban Forest Strategy - Making a great city greener 2012-2032 - Melbourne City Council
The Land Before Avocado - Richard Glover, 2018
Public hits back at 'hostile architecture' in European cities - thisisplace.org
City Scape - The Guardian Online
Wash Magazine - washmagazine.com
From Skyrail to sewer, Victoria embraces a new state of play - The Age
IKEA Disobedients (Madrid 2011), Andrés Jaque - https://vimeo.com/67141899

 
Selvportrett Hariton Pushwagner

Selvportrett Hariton Pushwagner

(DIF)ferent

Tutor: Andrea Giuradei (Architectus)
Schedule: Tuesday 17:30 - 20:30, Thursday 18:00 - 21:00
Location: Architectus

SUMMARY

The outcome of creating the ‘best places’ means “all people feel equally welcomed, their basic needs are met so that each can work and live with dignity and respect…”

David Cappo 2002 – Social policy reformist and was the Commissioner for Social Inclusion in SA

Over 4 million people in Australia have some form of disability, that’s 1 in 5 people. There are many different kinds of disability and they can result from accidents, illness or genetic disorders. A disability may affect mobility, ability to learn things, or ability to communicate easily, and some people may have more than one. A disability may be visible or hidden, may be permanent or temporary and may have minimal or substantial impact on a person’s abilities.

The studio will examine the influence and potential of Interior Design language towards establishing and improving the experience for people with disabilities with a focus to hospitality and in particular Hotel Design. In a fair world any establishment would offer an experience enjoyable for full able people as much as for people with special requirements, how far are we from it?

Through active analysis and discussion, existing design elements and principles will be investigated directly through a series of workshops focused on understanding and considering different viewpoints. As Harper Lee wrote “You never really understand a person until you consider things from his point of view - until you climb into his skin and walk around in it”.

The workshops will seek to investigate and understand key elements that contribute to a successful environment as step one in the Design Thinking method. Design Thinking is a solution-based approach to finding what would-be users really need. The method describes a human-centered, iterative design process consisting of 5 steps—Empathize, Define, Ideate, Prototype and Test. Design thinking is useful in tackling problems that are ill-defined or unknown.

Fundamental to the studio will be a continuous dialogue between the class and the multidisciplinary Architectus Team. Different guests will be called upon to present on the weekly topics, to illustrate the office’s past and current projects and contribute to review the work produced by the students.

The first half of semester will entail small graphic projects investigating key notions of design elements and principles, the second will culminate in student projects that propose speculative venue designs aiming to improve people’s mental health and well-being simply by being at an establishment.

The design studio will run in two blocks of three hours per week, over a twelve-week period. The proposed time is Tuesday night between 5:30PM - 8:30PM and Thursday night 5:30PM - 8:30PM2.

All classes will be held in the Architectus Office (Level 25, 385 Bourke Street)2.

Key Questions

The principles of universal and inclusive design are simple in nature, yet require careful consideration to execute successfully. Both a broad view of the application of the design and a focus on the way that the application is carried out are integral for a successful design. Inclusive design can be complex and the impacts across disability groups can be quite varied and at times conflicting.

Principles of universal and inclusive design include:

  • Equal Access - In order for a design to be truly universal, it must be useful to people with all kinds of conditions and abilities. This includes people with disabilities or activity limitations.

  • Flexibility - It’s important that the design is flexible enough to apply to all different kinds of people who have a huge variety of different abilities or disability.

  • Simplicity - The design should be easy to understand so that people with varying levels of education and experience can use it.

  • Effective communication - The design must convey the needed information to the user, even if they have limitations in their sensory capabilities or ability to process this information.

  • High tolerance for error - If a user accidentally makes a mistake while using the design, it’s important that they are not harmed or their situation is not made more difficult as a result.

  • Minimal effort required - A person should be able to apply the design easily, even if they have limits to their physical or mental capabilities.

  • Suitable space and size for use - No matter what size a person is or how mobile they are, they should have enough space and the ability to effectively use the design.

During the studio students will be called to design responding to the above principles, actively learning about how people with different abilities deal with day to day life with a demonstrably open mind and frame understanding of issues without ‘ableist’ bias.

Technology Summary

To David Meere, a visually impaired man from Melbourne, among the various obstacles to life in cities is another that is less frequently discussed: fear.

“The fear of not being able to navigate busy, cluttered and visually oriented environments is a major barrier to participation in normal life,” says Meere, 52, “be that going to the shops, going for a walk in the park, going to work, looking for work, or simply socialising.”

That’s what makes an innovative project at the city’s Southern Cross train station so important to him. A new “beacon navigation system” sends audio cues to users via their smartphones, providing directions, flagging escalator outages and otherwise transforming what was previously a “no-go” area for Meere.

“I no longer have to hope there’s a willing bystander or a capable staff member to provide direct assistance,” he says. “And on a very personal and powerful level it allows me to use this major transport hub in one of Australia’s largest cities with certainty and independence as a parent with small children. It’s a real game-changer.

Developments in genetics, artificial intelligence, robotics, nanotechnology, 3D printing and biotechnology, to name just a few, are all building on and amplifying one another within today’s world. Considering the role of expanded technology, students will be asked to consider the point at which these technologies meet the social factors of collaboration and social environments and how these could improve the hospitality experience for people with special needs.

Student Capabilities

The focus of the design studio is to work with the students in order to develop an understanding and ability to:
Understand the processes and key contributors to design;
Apply knowledge learnt through readings, class discussions, design case studies and site visits;
Analyse and respond to a series of key questions and topics of investigation;
Produce a considered and ‘future thinking’ design proposal;
Contribute to a creative approach within the field of hospitality design;
Evaluate how the practice of design led thinking can contribute to the developments of the future interior design;
Adapt a series of technologies to produce a creative response to a given brief.
Clearly communicate an individual approach to a creative solution.

Key Terms

Accessibility, Aesthetic Benefits, Alternative Strategies, Amenities, Arts and disability practice, Arts and health practice, Attendance, Behaviour mapping, Beautiful, Comfort, Community, Cloud Based, Collaboration, Confidence, Creative participation , Disability, Effective communication, Engagement, Equal Access, Flexibility, Functional, Freedom, Identity, Integrated Technology, Interaction, Minimal effort required, Multifunctional, Networking, Personal, NDIS, Recreational, Sensory Stimulation, Simplicity, Social Engagement, Suitable space, Minimal effort required, Tolerance for error, Understanding, Universal, Well-being, Wellness, Virtual

Precedents / References

Throughout the Studio a series of precedents will be discussed and a range of site visits will take place. The site visits will seek to explore conventional and unconventional spaces to allow an expansive approach to the idea of related precedents.
Well known in the hospitality industry is Robin Sheppard, a man on a mission. He has a vision, “What I’m after is a sense of going into a room designed for a disabled person and saying, ‘Wow, isn’t this fabulous?’ And that’s not a call I’ve heard very often.”
Sheppard is one of the UK’s leading hoteliers - co-founder of the Bespoke Hotel group, with 200 properties and 9,500 rooms, is the UK’s largest independent hotel group. In recent years it is his work as a champion of disability rights in the hospitality sector that has become his key focus.
Sheppard has an acute understanding of what it means to be a disabled hotel guest.
On Christmas Eve 2004 he started getting pins and needles in his arms and legs. Within hours he was paralyzed from the neck down and was later found to be suffering from Guillain-Barré Syndrome (GBS). Explaining this rare condition, which he dubs “Getting Better Slowly,” Sheppard says: “The immune system gets the wrong email and thinks it’s under attacks so it attacks itself. I had no idea what was happening to me.”
Over the next few years, Sheppard regained feeling in his legs, although he still has mobility issues. He was profoundly affected by the experience, writing a book, “A Solitary Confinement” about life dealing with GBS, before returning to work with a greater understanding of the needs of disabled people.
“I learned that the way in which I was studying how hotels reacted to and anticipated the needs of disabled people was pretty thin,” he says. “I started to research it and felt there was a bit of an injustice and a medicalization that was set up within hotels for disabled folk. I thought ‘It doesn’t need to be this way’.”
The necessary functionality should not detract from the design. He says hotel designs should be universal, personal, flexible, functional and beautiful.
It is a wholesale re-imagining of what accessible rooms should be, blending the needs of disabled guests, such as lower beds, accessible baths and wider doors, with a style and finish befitting of high-end hotels.
Sofitel Melbourne, Melbourne – AU // United Places Botanic Gardens, Melbourne – AU // Jackalope Mornington, Peninsula - AU // Holiday Inn, Geelong – AU // Ovolo Nishi, Canberra – AU // The Calile Hotel, Brisbane – AU // Upperscale Hotel, Rome – IT // Evripidis Hotel, Athen – GR // Form Hotel, Dubai – UAE // Private residences the Jaffa Hotel, Tel Aviv-Yafo - Israel // The Ned, London - UK // Hilton London Bankside, London - UK // Woodlark Hotel, Portand - USA // Tilden Hotel, San Francisco - USA // Shishi-Iwa House, Karuizawa – JP

Significant Media

Information on readings, texts, movies and other material will be distributed during the studio.
Other recommended texts include:
1984, George Orwell
Creative Cities, David Yencken
Hotel Planning and Design, Walter A. Rutes
Planning and Programming a Hotel, Jan A. deRoos
The Design Hotels™ Book 2018,
A Solitary Confinement, Robin Sheppar
Real, written and illustrated by Takehiko Inoue
Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD), United Nations
www.and.org.au - Australian Network on Disability -
www.disabilityhorizons.com - Disability Horizons
Jesse Kriss during the talk to he gave at Eyeo Festiva Fiction in 2015 explained how fiction can help us, often more in its form not its content. It can help us to clarify our own thoughts, help us test our ideas before we fully develop them, and help stay focused on the things that matter. Some recommended movies include:
Jacque Tati‘s Playtime @ 1967
Lynch ‘s The Elephant Man’s @ 1980
Ridley Scott’s Blade Runner @ 1980
Tim Burton’s Edward Scissorhands @ 1990
Andrew Niccol ‘s Gattaca @ 1996
Olivier Nakache’s The Intouchables @ 2012
Roger Ross Williams’s Life, Animated 2016


About Architectus

Architectus is a leading design studio that brings together the experience of more than 350 architects, interior architects, urban designers and urban planners.
With specialist expertise working across select industry sectors, Architectus enhances the way people live, learn, work and travel through their integrated and collaborative approach to planning and design.
Architectus’ work has been honoured with over 120 awards from the Australian Institute of Architects, the New Zealand Institute of Architects and the Planning Institute of Australia, as well as awards from specialist industry sectors.

1 Dif: Durable Medical Equipment Information Form (DIF) OR Certificate of Medical Necessity (CMN) is required to help document the medical necessity and other coverage criteria for selected durable medical equipment, prosthetics, orthotics, and supplies (DMEPOS) items.

2 This is a tentative program only and is subject to change.


 
Pandarosa.jpg

PRE NARRATIVES / POST ARCHIVES

Tutor: Pandarosa
Schedule: Tuesday 9:00am - 12:00pm +  15:00 - 18:00pm
Location: Morning 100.06.004, Afternoon 100.05.005

SUMMARY

The studio will engage Melbourne's Living Museum of the West as an explorative site.
Students will examine the museum's diverse archival material, historical context and object collection, as the developmental foundation towards both design research and interior / spatial outcome propositions.
These outcome will be achieved via a number of site visitations in which student will be ask to comprehensively engage and respond to diverse sites, conditions and materials through a range of exercises and onsite testing. Outcomes within these exercises may include historical research, material explorations, spatial thresholds, series of artefacts, photographic documentation, observational drawing, onsite testing, model making and others.
The studio will then ask students to develop one's own design research based on their particular encounters with site; utilising this design thinking / methodology towards proposing refined and befitting interior spatial solutions within the cultural / display / museum field.
Thoughts...
How could archival material / artefacts become a point of departure towards the development of interior built environments? Could chronicle matter expand from simply a 'moment in time' into the way interior spatial solutions are developed and produced?
How could a detailed encounter of site; in its physical, immaterial and historical context; inform and influence the interior experience?
What techniques could be carried out on location in order to extract content, as well as context, which is specific to site?
Could a series of artefacts created through onsite testing give way to propositions of new/altered built environments and interior experiences?
How could a dialogue be established between archival matter / objects and the interior experience? How can this translation influence the production and destabilisation of the interior experience?
By emphasising the importance of process, can we create a high level of inquisitive investigation and critical thinking towards the interior experience?
How could new interior built propositions reflect / embody the existing values of the museum; emphasising the importance of community involvement, preservation and social history; within their spatial and interior environment?
What methodologies and techniques can be utilised in order to put forward refined and befitting interior spatial solutions in line with the present cultural / display / museum field? How could these spatial arrangements accommodate, present and engage the archival material held by the museum?


Technology Summary

Techniques such as field testing, site observations, documentation and materiality extraction will be applied across a series of onsite engagements; informing the development of interior spatial outcomes.  
Hands on processes will be refined and spatially expanded into a mixture of digital and analogue outcomes as the unit progresses.
Hands-on processes may include, collage, drawing, photography, prototyping, model making, moulding and casting, others.
Onsite testing, prototyping and documentation will be key to the developing of ideas.
Engagement with a range of Interior built elements and material construction is expected.
Examining a variety of built interior situations with the view to developing ideas through arrangement and material detailing.
Resolving details within built environments through scale models and objects.
Responding to site through a strong finalised proposition / presentation.

Student Capabilities

Creating spatial complexities through design research, social positioning, encounter / engagement, onsite testing, archival / preservation reference, material exploration and historical context
Developing a series of resolved details through prototyping and refined model making.
Enhance initial on-site evaluations, engagements and experiments into possible site responses / interior design propositions. (Mid Semester evaluation)
Respond to site and program through the influence archival material / historical context into the proposition of interior experiences and built environments through spatial complexity. (End Semester evaluation
Model making, prototyping, drawing, documentation, observation, inquisitiveness, developing one's own design research / design methodology, creating a narrative / telling a story through spatial interior implementation, referencing historic and social context, the production of refined and befitting interior experiences.

Key Terms

Place / People / Local / Preservation / Archival / History/ ecomusée / Culture / Social / Narrative / Observation / Extraction / Engagement/ Re-construct / Re-imagining / Analysis / Process / Making / Documentation / Translation / Site / Program / Prototype / Model.

Site Visits

Melbourne's Living Museum of the West, Pipemakers Park, Van Ness Avenue, Maribyrnong

Precedents / References

Georges Henri Rivière
Hugues de Varine,
Psycho Buildings / Artists take on Architecture (Group exhibition at the Hayward, London)
Alejandro Aravena / elemental
Refurbishment Viaduct Arches; Zurich, Switzerland / EM2N
The Distillery by Kogaa. Brno, Czech Republic
Rural Studio, Auburn University - Newbern Library

Texts, Readings, Essays

The role of narrative in museum exhibition- Lynda Kelly – Australianmuseum.net.au
Bedford, L. (2001). Storytelling: The Real Work of Museums. Curator, 44(1), 27-34.
Allen, S. (2004b). Finding Significance. San Francisco: Exploratorium.
Adaptive Reuse: Extending the Lives of Buildings by Liliane Wong
Old Buildings, New Designs: Architectural Transformations (Architecture Briefs)- 2011
The Archive: Whitechapel Documents of Contemporary Art by Charles Merewether.
Psycho Buildings: Artists Take On Architecture: Architecture by Artists
Form and Structure: the Organisation of Interior Space, by Graeme Broker and Sally Stone

 
Anne Imhof, Faust, 2017. German Pavilion, 57th International Art Exhibition – La Biennale di Venezia © Photography: Nadine Fraczkowski. Courtesy: German Pavilion 2017 and the artist

Anne Imhof, Faust, 2017. German Pavilion, 57th International Art Exhibition – La Biennale di Venezia
© Photography: Nadine Fraczkowski. Courtesy: German Pavilion 2017 and the artist

A SPECULATIVE REORGANANISATION

Tutor: Angela Brophy
Schedule: Tuesday 9:00am - 12:00pm +  15:00 - 18:00pm
Location: Morning 100.06.006, Afternoon 100.05.007

SUMMARY

How might designers formulate spaces to accommodate a non-linear, speculative model of art practice where the present is shaped just as much by the future than it is from the past?

In this studio students will be introduced to emergent curatorial and art institutional models to access how interior design practices might collaborate and facilitate a collective subjective experience for audiences. How might designers actively speculate interior space to tell stories, riff on existing narratives and give inclusive and collective agency to reimagine? How might designers embrace a post contemporary and speculative reorganisation of time that operationalises the present outside of itself?

Students will be introduced to international or local case study exhibitions and and asked to re-examine their properties with a sense of future-thinking that (pre-) conditions a pluralistic approach to audience experience.

Students will engage with the processes of exhibition design, exhibition-making and institutional models of art production and presentation to give background to imagining a design that unfolds within and beyond its own making. Students will be encouraged to develop a sensibility to exhibition and institutional design that can not only incorporates, but also potentially generates, change.

Key Questions

How can design and art decentralise the present?
What strategies and material concerns might invoke audience autonomy, agency and/or collective subjectivity?
Can the virtual better encompass a speculative reality than the material?
How do art spaces best acknowledge speculative time in the post contemporary?
What is the value of exhibition design in contribution to exhibition conceptualisation and making?

Technology Summary

Whilst also engaging with material concerns in studio experiments that may incorporate object making, installation, photography, video, students will navigate through processes of observation of existing and case study exhibitions through critical analysis, cognitive and spatial mapping using collage, digital and analogue model building to conceptualise a speculative exhibition and design.

Student Capabilities

In this subject, students will engage in site, exhibition and institutional analysis  to gain an understanding of curatorial frameworks and reconsider the public relationships to exhibition presentation. Through observation and reflection they will apply strategies of future-thinking in constructing their own approaches to exhibition design using a range of design techniques, to visually articulate space, material and concept. Students will gain skills in drawing, object maquette and exhibition model making, digital and analogue collage, spatial mapping in site analysis exercises and curatorial methodologies.

Key Terms

Speculative design / Post contemporary / Worlding / Non-linear time / Curatorial models / Science fiction / Exhibition-making / Exhibition design

Significant Texts and Readings

Armen Avanessian & Suhail Malik, The Time-Complex. Postcontemporary. Conversation transcript, Berlin, 29 January 2016 <https://bb9.berlinbiennale.de/the-time-complex-postcontemporary/>
Amelia Barikin, Parallel Presents: The Art of Pierre Huyghe. MIT Press, 2012.
Donna Haraway, The Haraway Reader. Routledge New York and London, 1984.
Viktor Delaqua, The importance of the sketch in Renzo Piano’s work, ArchDaily website, 2017 <https://www.archdaily.com/877340/the-importance-of-the-sketch-in-renzo-pianos-work>
Charles Green & Anthony Gardner, Biennials, Triennials and Documenta: The exhibitions that created Contemporary Art. Wiley-Blackwell, 2016.
Carolyn Christov-Bakargiev,  Leverhulme Lecture II: Worlding: From the Archive to the Compost. University of Leeds, 2014. <https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F8Jl8xvdHKM>

Precedents and References

Donna Haraway
Armen Avanessian
Suhail Mailik
Pierre Hugyhe
Hito Steyerl
Ursula LeGuin
Ian Cheng
Renzo Piano