2017 Semester 2

 
The Design Plot, the dance performance brought by Shelley Lasica 

The Design Plot, the dance performance brought by Shelley Lasica 

WITHOUT THE SPACE WITHIN 

Tutors: Liz Lambrou + Shelley Lasica
Schedule: Tuesdays 12.30-15.30 + Thursdays 9.00-12.00
Location: Tuesdays 100.06.005 + Thursdays 100.05.005

SUMMARY

The studio seeks to investigate and produce interior spatial outcomes in response to ‘the design plot' a dance performance project by Shelley Lasica. The work combines choreography that explores the various ways in which spaces are occupied, aims to understand systems of sensory awareness, explores the idea of construction as scenography, and delves into the problematic nature of decision making.
The performance unfolds as an event that combines research, performance, and play, using both choreographic and physical practice, aiming to explore the themes of: 
How are we ‘together' in relation to each other in the spaces that we inhabit? 
How do we understand these shifting circumstances physically? 
How do we understand where we are sensorily and metaphorically? 
How these types of perception function for the performers and audience in their understanding and enjoyment of choreography?
We will investigate concepts of narrative space, occupation wayfinding, systems of sensory awareness, perception, boundaries, and frame in relation to real and imagined spatial scenarios.

Technology summary

The technology aspect of the studio will take part in a range of ways and through a succession of approaches to choreography and scenography. Concepts of space, place, context, archive, memory, time and duration will be examined through site/s observation, critical reading and documentation.

Students will be asked to produce and experiment thoroughly with techniques of photography, drawing, diagramming, digital media, modelling and installation practices.

Student capabilities

Students will learn through following activities and approaches:
Ability to research and catalogue site program and contexts through photography/drawing/diagramming/making /processing/editing and installation
Ability to synthesize spatial complexities through designed physical (material), virtual (digital) and speculative spatial outcomes.
Ability to effectively and creatively communicate observations and intent
Create drawings, objects, physical installations and digital outcomes through various materials and media.
Experience in creative modes of site analysis.
Processes of transformation and transference through analysis, reflection, remaking & representations. 
Ability to make, craft, refine catalogue and exhibit a series of workings
Ability to practice independent ideas through a range of explorative, experimental and speculative approaches to design.

Key terms

Space/place/context/ archive/ memory/time/duration/Occupation /Performativity / action / body space/Systems of sensory awareness/ way finding / perception/ boundary/ shift/ scale/Narrative space/Frame/ physical /nonphysical /Site responsive/ connection and disconnection/ real space / filmic space/usage/ familiarity /ownership Unpacking a set of strategies and relationships Unpacking familiar space/ place making

Precedents / References

Judith butler
Janine Antoni
Sabine Breitweiser
Claire Bishop, Dance in the museum
Merce Cunningham, Common Time
Etienne Jules Marey, chronophotography
Mark Van Overeem
Jorinde Voigt
Paul Virilio

Texts, readings, essays

http://intermsofperformance.site
Bernard Tschumi, The Manhattan Transcripts (1981)
Robert Klanten, Data Flow 2: Visualizing Information in Graphic Design (2010)
Paul Arthur, Wayfinding: People, Signs and Architecture (1992)
Hornercker, E. Physicality in Tangible Interactions: Bodies
and the World. UK: University of Sussex
Diller, Elizabeth, Scofidio, Ricardo. Teyssot, Georges, &
Diller Scofidio. (1994). Flesh : Architectural Probes. New
York: Princeton Architectural Press.
Paul Virilio, "The Third Window: an Interview with Paul Virilio," in Cynthia Schneider and Brian Wallis, eds., Global Television (New York: Wedge Press. 1988).

 
Collage of images by Nicholas Rebstadt

Collage of images by Nicholas Rebstadt

SOFTSPACE/HARDSPACE 

Tutor: Nicholas Rebstadt
Schedule: Tuesdays 12:30-15:30 + Thursdays 9:00-12:00
Location: Tuesdays 100.05.06 + Thursdays 100.05.003

SUMMARY

In a world where the flows of information form and shape our spatial experiences as much as the physical or material conditions of that space, what impact does this have on the composition of interiors? What is it, to think and work with information space as a design medium, and what are the implications on the subjectivity of the individual and the practice of the designer in designing these spaces?
Soft Space | Hard Space: contemporary spatial thresholds is seeded in the arena of ‘disruption’ sitting at the intersection of the informational and the ‘concrete’. It seeks to question and explore new spaces of intersection (or contention?) between information flow and concrete space are crafted, who is doing the crafting and how individuals experience them. Perhaps most importantly, how can we design with them?
If we conceptualise interior design as being a temporal composition of spatial and relational (situational) elements, then the way technology and information is influencing these dynamics is of primary concern to designers inhabiting and working within contemporary space. 
Constantly peddled examples of ‘innovative’ disruption are tech ‘unicorns’, like Über, Snapchat, AirBnB, et. al. are undoubtedly changing the way that we experience online space and form relationships with one another. How is their ‘application’ affecting concrete built spatial environments and the practitioners who deal with space as material on a daily basis?
Often, impacts of these environments are seen through insurrection and disruption from a more traditionally historical idea of disruption, for instance the Occupy movement’s manifestation as a result of (according to them) unfair pooling of globalised capital, in addition the very buildings that they occupy street frontage of are also an expression of the same immaterial force (capital) that shapes the city’s form. Such confrontations or manifestations cannot escape the discipline of interior design, and have the potential to be part of the ‘matter’ from which designers can add to a growing toolbox of media.
The participants of the studio will undertake a research-driven, speculative design project that seeks to work at the threshold of ‘soft’ space and ‘hard’ space; undertaking a re-imagining of the potential of; and ways this space can be occupied.

Questions

These questions become the framework for the inquiry, research & experimentation that students may undertake in their studio projects. 
In a world where the flows of information form and shape our spatial experiences as much as the physical or material conditions of that space, what impact does this have on the composition of interiors? 
What is it, to think and work with a contemporary informational space as a design medium, and what are the implications on the subjectivity of the individual and the practice of the designer in these spaces?
Where is the space of information? What impact does it have? Who controls this information, who produces-consumes it?
What is the implication of this technology and information on interior spaces? 
What and how can interior designers embrace, understand and critically challenge this technology (“soft space”) and rework it both subversively and entrepreneurially?
What is ‘innovation’?
How can designers materialise the immaterial or dematerialise the material? 
Does an interior need to exist to be designed?
What is the impact of speed/on demand culture on design and the human condition?

Technology summary

The technology component of this course varies depending on the nature of design inquiry for each brief. Students will engage in wire framing and development strategies for user experience and user interface design work applied to built space. They will also develop skills in the application of multimedia and technology to design interiors. This should take the form of advanced experiential mock-ups and detailed wire-frame and storyboard diagrams that are needed to begin the development of this form of technology. 
The application of this technology is hands-on in asking students to engage directly with the spaces they propose to work within developing live mock-ups wherever possible.
In addition to this, students are expected to capture data and analyse and curate it accordingly for design. Further to this, students will be asked to engage with traditional construction and detailing technology in interior design practice where applicable.

Student capabilities

Design responses around, and that use information flows, data and capital to shape the way that individuals encounter and ‘experience’ interior spaces, and the potential that designers have in working with this conceptually and practically.
Develop skills in diagramming, wire-framing and basic user interface design (UI). 
Use multimedia to develop interior spaces and spatial installations.
Advanced knowledge of spatial programming through the use of a variety of design methodologies related to relational, informational, multimedia and built form.
Read, interpret data and information (theory, reports, capital) and express this through design speculative and propositional design work. 
Develop the ability to define and work through a design strategy applied to practice. 

Key terms

softspace / HARDSPACE
Phenomenology
Concrete
Immaterial
Simulation
Relational Design
Hacking
Spatial Programming
Design Thinking
Speed
Innovation
Disruption (economic)
Disruption (political)
Augmentation

Precedents / references

METAHAVEN, NL
Blast Theory, UK
Santiago Cireuda, Spain
Hefin Jones, UK
Jeremy Deller, UK

Texts, readings, essays

Augé, Marc. Ch. 6 “Innovation” in The Future. Verso, London: 2014
Bourriaud, Nicolas. The Exform. Verso, London: 2016
Kraus, Chris. Where Art Belongs. Semiotext(e), United States: 2010.
Landwher, Dominik (ed.). Political Interventions. Christoph Merian Verlag, Switzerland: 2014. (edition-digitalculture.ch)  
Landwher, Dominik (ed.). Hacking. Christoph Merian Verlag, Switzerland: 2014. (edition-digitalculture.ch)
Landwher, Dominik (ed.). Public Domain. Christoph Merian Verlag, Switzerland: 2015. (edition-digitalculture.ch)
Lange, Christy. “Show me the Receipts: How artists are mapping the  ow of onshore and o shore global wealth, before and after the Panama Papers” in Frieze. Issue 182: 2016. https://frieze.com/article/show-me-receipts
Rosler, Martha. “Culture Class: Art, Creativity, Urbanism: Part I”. in e-Flux. http://www.e-flux.com/journal/21/67676/culture-class-art-creativity-urbanism-part-i/ 
“Home suite home: Why Marriott is turning some of its rooms into communal apartments”. In The Economist. http://www.economist.com/blogs/gulliver/2017/02/home-suite-home
The Economist Films. “The Disruptors”. http://eydisrupters.films.economist.com
McKee, Francis. “Opening Up.” In East End Transmissions. Glasgow: 2015. https://issuu.com/glittery/docs/eet-layouts_finalx2/12

 
VCCC Central Atrium and Welcome Hall, Image by Peter Bennetts

VCCC Central Atrium and Welcome Hall, Image by Peter Bennetts

HUMAN CENTERED  

Tutor: Leah Heiss
Schedule: Tuesdays 9:00-12:00 + 15:30-18:30
Location: Morning session 100.05.006 + Afternoon session 100.01.00B

SUMMARY

This studio focuses on human-centred design - across spaces, artefacts, technologies and experience. The studio draws from contemporary human-centred practices – including design ethnography, co-design and participatory design. Human.Centred will help students to understand more deeply the person at the end of their design process: the patient in the hospital; the child in the classroom; the museum-goer in the exhibition, the teenager in the library. Projects will build in scale from smaller scale value fictions (speculative designs) through to larger scale spatial environments. The final project will equip you to develop and drive your own human-centred design project, which engages with a unique community in one of two sites – a cultural environment or a healthcare space. The design interventions may be cultural, political, creative, informational or health oriented and will be employ design thinking approaches to design, build and test human-centred spaces that resonate with their audiences.
Through Human.Centred students will develop skills in human-centred design through designing and facilitating workshops and interviews, to develop a deeper understanding of the expectations, wants, needs and desires of the people at the end of the design process. The studio will actively engage with a range of public human-centred environments - the Pauline Gandel Children's Gallery at the Melbourne Museum, The Children’s Gallery at the NGV, The Immigration Museum, Peter Mac Cancer Centre, The City of Melbourne libraries, and ONJ Cancer and Wellness Centre, all of which engage extensive user engagement processes as a key part of designing space and place. We will also use the NGV exhibition Creating the Contemporary Chair to provide inspiration for material investigations and the Museum Victoria Archives as a reference for understanding ways to collect and manage information. 

Technology summary

Technology will be workshop-based and will comprise a series of projects that use wood, metal and thermoplastics. Through hands-on projects you will create human-centred design artefacts that can be embedded in people’s lives, providing strong feedback on the way that people engage with your designs. The first workshop project will challenge you to disassemble a consumer product, understand its constituent parts, categorise and document these before recycling the parts. The archiving and documentation of these ‘parts’ will be inspired by the Melbourne Museum archives and work of Todd McLellan. The aim of this project is to learn about ways to design with the user in mind, at every stage of the project. The second project will engage you to work with thermoplastics to design an artefact with affordances. Thermoplastics are materials that can be formed then ‘un-formed’ and recreated – allowing us to iteratively design a spatial artefact for human use. The final project will challenge you to create a refined 1:1 detail from your public design environment, seamlessly bringing together metal (mild steel, copper, brass or aluminium) and wood in a highly finished artefact that invites human touch.

Student capabilities

Development of competencies around human centred design principles as a way of engaging the input of stakeholders in the design process.
Development of innovative ways to engage human centred processes through diagrammatic, filmic and other communication modalities.
Development of an understanding of the differences/similarities between human centred design, co-design, participatory design, User Centered Inclusive Design.
Development of basic skills and understanding of design ethnography, design anthropology.
Competencies in navigating public environments and negotiating with stakeholders.
Development of strong skills in designing artefacts and environments and communicating these through a variety of media.
Development of skills in iterative design using prototypes.
Development of skills in navigating workshop environments and developing projects in a range of media.

Precedents / references

Melbourne Museum Pauline Gandel Children’s Gallery
Melbourne Museum Bunjilaka Gallery
NGV Children’s Gallery
NGV Creating the Contemporary Chair
Victorian Comprehensive Cancer Centre
Olivia Newton-John Cancer Centre
Dunne and Raby
Todd McLellan
Jacopo Foggini
GT2P
Jolan van der Wiel
James Shaw - Well Proven Chair
Dale Hardiman

Texts, readings, essays

Jesper Simonsen, Toni Robertson, Routledge International Handbook of Participatory Design
Bowker and Star, Sorting things out
Sarah Pink, Doing Sensory Ethnography
Elizabeth Sanders + Pieter Jan Stappers, “Probes, toolkits and prototypes: three approaches to making in codesigning.”
Stephanie Houde + Charles Hill, ‘What Do Prototypes Prototype?’ In Handbook of Human-Computer Interaction (Second Edition)
Allan Newell, Design and the Digital Divide: Computer Support for Older and Disabled People
Wendy Gunn et al., Design Anthropology
Dunne and Raby, Speculative Everything
Dunne and Raby, Design Noir – The Secret Life of Everyday Objects
James Gibson, The Senses Considered as Perceptual Systems

 
Image credit: ANVAM

Image credit: ANVAM

#310SKR

Tutor: Phoebe Whitman
Schedule: Tuesdays 9:00-12:00 + 12:30-15:30
Location: Morning session 100.05.003 + Afternoon session 100.04.008

SUMMARY

The studio will consider ways to celebrate historical value in relationship to restoration, reuse and adaptation. The studio will propose ways to consider restoring and adapting the existing art deco building and its interior at 310 St Kilda Road. With particular attention to existing conditions, surfaces, materials and atmospheric qualities in site, these will form the basis of the research in order to transform and adapt the interior so that it engages with and accommodates a multiplicity of readings and platforms for exhibition, civic dialogue, community connectivity and programmatic flexibility. 

Students will develop experimental and explorative tactics and modes of working in response to the site. Practices related to sympathy, lightness, temporality and sensitivity will be developed through techniques and approaches in responsiveness, restoration, adaption, as a means to reactivate and renew the site for future occupation. 

The studio is associated with the Australian National Veterans Arts Museum (ANVAM), which is the Public Benevolent Institution supporting veterans through the arts. ANVAM is working with the Federal and State Governments on the transfer of 310 St Kilda Road, which is the old Repatriation Clinic at the Corner of St Kilda Rd and Coventry St, Southbank, for the purpose of establishing a new cultural center for veterans’ arts.

The site consists of the only art deco building on St Kilda Road north of Toorak Road. It was built in 1937 as a health facility for WWI veterans and performed that function for approximately 40 years through the WWII, Korean and Vietnam War years. The site has been vacant for over 20 years and it is the ANVAM’s agenda to restore and renew the building through the adaptation of the site into a cultural precinct. It is the intention of Australian National Veterans Arts Museum to keep the site as close to its original form and to acknowledge its history as a means to honour the hundreds of thousands of veterans who visited their doctor and used it as a place of well being.

The studio will focus on the certain areas within the building and will seek to respond to the brief issued by ANVAM for the design of gallery and exhibition spaces, as well as addressing notions of well being, connection, community and belonging.

Technology summary

The technology aspect of the studio will take part in a range of ways and through a succession of approaches to observation, design and production. The technology component of the studio will be interwoven throughout the studio through the approach to making and working with observational techniques, documentation, image production and material exploration.
Techniques in collage, appropriation and restoration will allow students to work through ways of recognising the site as retaining material, spatial and atmospheric conditions that can be responded to, intensified and celebrated.
Students will engage with techniques of mapping, diagramming, drawing, and object modelling, and image making in order to address the complex ideas of program, use and identity. 
Students will be asked to produce and experiment thoroughly with different modes of making such as collage, modelling objects, photography and drawing.
In the end, students will have produced a series of 2D and 3D pieces that represent and perform qualities related to their design proposal. 
Techniques in image production both through abstract and experiential imagery as well as design drawings and more practical imagery will be produced. 
Techniques in image making that explore deconstructed, rearranged, and reimagined potentials of site.

Student Capabilities 

Ability to engage critically and creatively with complex cultural and programmed sites and contexts
Ability to synthesize ideas into designed material and spatial outcomes
Ability to understand broader cultural concerns and tendencies related to the studio
Ability to practice independent ideas through a range of explorative, experimental and speculative approaches to design
Ability to interpret and respond in critical ways to reading theoretical texts
Ability to make aesthetic choices in 2D and 3D forms; graphic representational techniques and material selections
Ability to engage with a range diverse processes and pictorial modes of production, ranging from abstract, representational and pragmatic
Ability to understand contemporary and historical modes of spatial practice in relationship to the topic of restoration, community, identity, art, exhibition, well being

Key Terms

Gallery / Exhibition
Museum / Memorial
Identity / Community
Private / Public
Civic / Communal
Restoration / Renewal
Curating / Arrangement
Adaptive / Reuse
Surface / Materiality
Health / Well-being
Absence / Presence
Program / Arrangement
Past / Present

Precedents / references

Hans Ulrich Orbrist
Carol Bove
Sou Fujimoto
Rem Koolhaas
David Chipperfield Architects

Sites / projects

Kukje Gallery by So-Il
Rolex Learning Center by SANAA, at the Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne in Switzerland
Glass Pavilion at the Toledo Museum of Art / SANAA
Neues Museum, Berlin restoration by David Chipperfield and Julian Harrap  
Kolumba Museum by Peter Zumthor
Naoshima Island, Japan
Mimesis Art Museum by Alvaro Siza
Álvaro Siza and Eduardo Souto Design Extension for Abade Pedrosa Museum in Portugal
Switch House, TATE Modern, London by Herzog & de Meuron
The renovated Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam by Cruz y Ortiz
Palais de Tokyo Expansion in 2002 by architects Lacaton & Vassal
Arno Brandlhuber’s Potsdam Bunker

 
Images from top r: Miguel Chevalier, Peter Kogler, Alissa Andrasek + Jose Sanchez, Anne-Marie Yee, NGV water wall, Thomas Heatherwick, Callum Morton

Images from top r: Miguel Chevalier, Peter Kogler, Alissa Andrasek + Jose Sanchez, Anne-Marie Yee, NGV water wall, Thomas Heatherwick, Callum Morton

PAV/LOV/RRR

Tutor: Andrew Miller
Schedule: Tuesdays 9:00-12:00 + 12:30-15:30
Location: Morning session 100.05.004A + Afternoon session 100.06.007

SUMMARY

The focus of this studio will be to design a speculative pavilion for the NGV Temporal pavilion competition from an interior design perspective.
The seemingly ubiquitous  pavilion is commonly expressed from an architectural frame of reference, where precedence is often given to form finding, complex geometry and the exploration of new fabrication techniques over how they perform as interior spaces. This studio questions this premise and gives priority to designing a temporal space (the pavilion) from an interior design orientation while still working with new and emerging design technologies.
Students will engage with the conceptual framework that built form (interior and exterior) is a semi-living thing - an affective ecology of ‘things’; an assemblage of materials, atmospherics, memories, objects, bodies (inanimate and animate). 
To enable this design process, students will be researching the NGV site as an archaeological ‘dig’ of specific site conditions and research into the practices of artists, photographers and designers from the gallery collection.  This initial research will foreground ways of engaging with the competition brief that explores concepts of spatial activation and audience engagement; cultural resonance. materials and systems; sustainability; manufacturing and fabrication and technology. 
The final proposal will be a professional competition entry where students will be required to produce digital 3d models, scale drawings, operational diagrams and a highly developed graphic style that clearly articulates the concepts of a temporal space (pavilion) designed through interior concepts. The final proposal may take the form of a ‘serious’ competition entry, a futuristic speculation, a political/cultural/environmental critique, a celebration of ‘otherness’ or a combination of any of the above!

Technology summary

The overall technological concern for this studio is for students to experiment, develop and express a design making language that is specific to the approach and logic of each students design speculation.  
As a way of developing and expressing this language participants will begin by producing a series of digital speculative responses to the weekly design briefs, engaging with the techniques of digital modelling, digital image making, hand modelling, photography, film and graphics.
 As the design process progresses through the semester, students will engage with digital modelling techniques using software packages such as, Rhino, Vray and Photoshop then prototype their ideas through digital fabrication techniques such as, physical and laser cut model making, thermoforming, cnc milling etc. in conjunction with graphic visualisation techniques that clearly communicates each participants pavilion design.

Student Capabilities 

Design in response to a competition brief through  interior design concepts
The ability to engage analytically and imaginatively through design using theoretical concepts
The ability to research and apply precedent studies
The ability to effectively express and articulate a visual design language in relation to the  logic of the design proposal.
The ability to understand making, drawing, crafting, image making and digital modelling/fabrication as a way of understanding materials and their spatial effects.
The ability to refine design through iteration

Key Terms 

Creaturely
Urban Interior
Assemblage
Design ecology
Politics of space
Otherness 

Precedents / references 

http://www.ecologicstudio.com/v2/index.php
http://walledoffhotel.com/
https://www.ngv.vic.gov.au/
http://www.serpentinegalleries.org/explore/pavilion
http://www.creativeapplications.net/
http://assemblestudio.co.uk/
http://www.muf.co.uk/
http://www.environmentalhealthclinic.net/projects/
http://we-make-money-not-art.com/
https://hyperallergic.com/

Texts, readings, essays 

Suzie Attiwill, ‘Urban and Interior: techniques for an urban interiorist’, Urban Interior: informal explorations, interventions and occupations
Van Schaik, Leon, & Watson, Fleur. (2015). Pavilions, pop-ups and parasols : The impact of real and virtual meeting on physical space. London, UK: John Wiley & Sons.
Pallasmaa, Juhani. The Eyes of the Skin : Architecture and the Senses (3). Somerset: John Wiley & Sons, Incorporated, 2012.
Zumthor, Peter. Atmospheres : Architectural Environments ; Surrounding Objects. Basel: Boston : Birkhäuser, 2006.
Treib, Marc. Space Calculated in Seconds : The Philips Pavilion, Le Corbusier, Edgard Varese. Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press, 1996.
Jodidio, Philip. Serpentine Gallery Pavilions. Köln: Taschen, 2011.
Nathaniel Stern - Interactive Art and Embodiment: The Implicit Body as Performance
Lucy Bullivant - Responsive Environments: Architecture, Art and Design
Michael Fox - Interactive Architecture: Adaptive World

 
Image by Tina Atic

Image by Tina Atic

INSIDE THE COLLAGE

Tutor: Tina Atic
Schedule: Tuesdays 12:30-15:30 + Thursdays 9:00-12:00
Location: Tuesdays 100.04.005 + Thursdays 100.05.004A

SUMMARY

To dwell implies the establishment of a meaningful relationship between man and a given environment. […] This relationship consists in an act of identification, that is, in a sense of belonging to a certain place. […] On the other hand, man is also a wanderer. As homo viator, he is always on the way, which implies a possibility of choice. […] This dialectic of departure and return, of path and goal, is the essence of that existential ‘spatiality’ which is set into work by architecture. […]
Volume 9: Aesthetics and Philosophy of Art (Guttorm Fløistad) pg. 201

The studio will explore the reconstruction of the body of space through collage, to be rigorously explored through weekly investigations dissecting all the parts of the dwelling/home (living room/ bedroom/ kitchen/ bathroom/ toilet/…) in order to define another process of creating/recreating space that expands on the dialogue between the beholder/ inhabitant of the home. 
The process of collaging through various instructors/ precedents/ references intends to generate and refine techniques of constructing interiors that relate to new ideas about belonging and intimacy exploring new ways of drawing existing (visible/ obvious/ dominant/ physical/…) and imaginary (hidden/ forgotten/ insignificant/ intimate/ perceived/ experienced/…) places for living.
The home is to be redesigned and reconstructed within the parameters of a space/ surface of significance (bedroom/ toilet/ closet/ cupboard/ wall/ floor/ ceiling/ tile/…) to re-evaluate the experience of places for living through experimentation with visual representation and manipulation of scale.
Does the home need all the parts that it is composed of? Can it be stripped down to its essential parts? Can everything else be experienced in an image or do the essential parts need to be reconsidered/ rearranged/ redesigned/…? Do walls have to be shifted, added, cut out, distorted,…? Can the image/ drawing/ model generated through the process of collaging inform the way in which an interior could be reconstructed? After all, one space/ interior consists of a universe of spaces/ interiors.

This will be approached through the construction of a kit of parts*, which will serve as a visual catalogue and library of the physical and imaginary elements captured/documented.
Kit of Parts – Physical Elements: walls, doors, windows, materials, colours, textures, furniture
Kit of Parts – Imaginary Elements: perception, experience, natural and artificial lighting, shadows, time, weather, atmosphere, inhabitation

By gathering / dissecting / manipulating precedents and references as well as constructed visual documentation (Kit of Parts) the process of collaging will be explored in the following manner:
1) Drawing/ Tracing; experimenting with one and a range of different mediums
2) Cutting/ Folding/ Extracting/ Repeating/ Fading/ Highlighting/ Blurring/ Scaling; experimenting with one and a range of different mediums
3) Combining 1 and 2; experimenting with one and a range of different mediums
4) Constructing a physical and/or digital model of 1/2/3 or a combination of several/all; experimenting with one and a range of different mediums

These investigations are to be summarised in the ‘Wunderkammer’ at the mid-semester presentations, which will inform the final project. The final project  that will take a closer look at Gordon Matta-Clark and Sinta Werner in the realisation of a 1:1 installation to be put together by the whole group, forming an amalgamation of selected sectional components/ fragments/ physical and imaginary elements (kit of parts) from each student. 

Questions

What makes a dwelling a dwelling?
What are the crucial parts of the body of space?
What are the other/hidden/forgotten parts?
What do you need to make a dwelling? – Is there a kit of parts that could be created?
How many types of dwellings are out there? - What is the type of your dwelling? 
Is there a way that one could draw/redraw - create/recreate space through different methods of collaging and redefine the meaning of the physical dwelling through the inhabitation of the imaginary dwelling - to be redesigned and reconstructed within the parameters of a space/ surface of significance (bedroom/ toilet/ closet/ cupboard/ wall/ floor/ ceiling/ tile/…) to re-evaluate the experience of places for living through experimentation with visual representation and manipulation of scale.
How big/small/dark/light/old/new/… is the dwelling? - How big/small/dark/light/old/new/… could the dwelling be? Is it all in your closet, the stairs, in another context, another house/ building?

Technology summary

The projects will be approached with a very graphic and tactile engagement. Students will need to engage with various materials and mediums from paper, boxboard to fabric. Using a range of mediums such as pencil, pen, ink, paint. Students are asked to engage with both hands-on and digital approaches through the production of physical models and digital models and scaled pieces. Software will include Rhinoceros, Photoshop and Illustrator.

Student capabilities

Ability to explore the concept of dwelling/home/habitation through research into precedents and references  
Ability to explore a range of techniques and methods of observation
Ability to engage with architectural structures to reimagine their spatial potentials
Ability to document and present observations and creative perceptions of both existing and potential designs  
Ability to engage with various techniques of collage, drawing and model making
Ability to engage with theoretical concepts through reading and responding to certain key theorists

Key Terms

Home
Dwelling
Structure
Construction
Reimagine
Collage

Precedents / references

Hannah Höch
Annegret Soltau
Kurt Kranz
Henri Matisse
László Moholy-Nagy
Man Ray
Naum Gabo
Frauke Dannert
Eduardo Chillida
Kurt Schwitters
Masato Takasaka
Jesús Vassallo
Gordon Matta-Clark
John Stezaker
Sinta Werner

Texts, readings, essays

Life: A User’s Manual (Georges Perec)
The Address Book (Sophie Calle)
Poetics of Space (Gaston Bachelard)
Such Places as Memory: Poems 1953 - 1996 (John Hejduk) 
The Secret Lives of Colour (Kassia St Clair) 
Volume 9: Aesthetics and Philosophy of Art (Guttorm Fløistad)
Philosophy and the City: Classic to Contemporary Writings (Sharon M. Meagher)
Private Dwelling: Contemplating the Use of Housing (Peter King)
Walter Benjamin: Theoretical Questions (David S. Ferris)
Walter Benjamin: Traces of Craft (Esther Leslie)
Photography and the paradigm of the trace (Daniel Nevin)
[Un]built (Raimund Abraham) 
Themes of Contemporary Art: Visual Art after 1980 (Jean Robertson and Craig McDaniel)
Merz World: Processing the Complicated Order (Adrian Notz and Hans Ulrich Obrist)
Kurt Schwitters’ Merzbau: The Cathedral of Erotic Misery (Elizabeth Burns Gamard) 
Dadas on Art (Lucy R. Lippard) 
Wunderkammer (Tod Williams and Billie Tsien)

 
Untitled by Julia Bachrach 2015

Untitled by Julia Bachrach 2015

RE-COLLECT

Tutor: Ying Lan-Dann + Pia Socias
Schedule: Tuesdays 12:30-15:30 + Thursdays 9:00-12:00
Location: Tuesdays 100.04.002 + Thursdays 100.04.002

SUMMARY

re-collect studio will examine spaces of re-collection and the processes of building/designing from memory, memorialising quotidian space and objects, collecting, representing, archiving and displaying material. How do we measure value? What and Who deserve to be memorialised?
The studio will centre around the Marion Mahony and Walter Burley Griffin designed Incinerator Complex in Moonee Ponds. The decommissioned Mahony - Griffin incinerator represents an intriguing paradox; once it was a space of object disposal and today, a space of object reverie. How might you develop a memorial to Mahony - the largely forgotten female partner, within the Burley Griffin legacy. How might you engage with notions of value and permanence?
The studio will commence with looking at and understanding the two key drivers of the project: re-collection and the process of memorialising: What and who are memorialised? What and who make it into the history books? Students will engage with two distinct lines of enquiry throughout weeks 1 - 6. 
On Tuesdays, students will be introduced to the extraordinary architectural practice of Marion Mahoney, once described as Frank Lloyd Wright’s right hand (man). You will be asked to respond to a range of key Mahoney/Griffin works, asking what approaches the duo took: How are these spaces articulated; What formal language is adopted? You will refer to Mahony’s unpublished manifesto and memoir The Magic of America in conjunction with seminal projects to produce 2 x 3 week projects, analyzing through drawing, designing and making, individually and collaboratively, identifying and establishing the Mahony Griffin language, considering how might you critically appropriate these approaches into your own practice?
On Thursdays, students will research contemporary memorial spaces through making, reading and analysing with a view towards producing weekly-fortnightly memorials to the quotidian, collective and barely seen. In the spirit of the Mahoney and Burley Griffin collaboration, students will undertake a range of collaborative tasks, designed to offer students a critical perspective of representations of
authorship: How has the Mahony-Griffin’s practice been represented through the historical record? 
For the students’ final project, they will develop a memorial archive honouring Marion Mahoney, re-collecting her work extraordinary contributions to the practice through reference to archival sources and the building itself. Students will have the opportunity to work onsite within The Incinerator space. 

Technology summary

Phase 1, students will will explore conventional drawings, such as plan, section and elevation, using watercolour, line and hatching techniques. Students will examine methods, such as walking, collecting, monumentalising and recording, as means of producing memorial space. As a collective, you will be encouraged to problematise and unpack the idea of collective memorial:  How do you bring these subjective memories together through fictionalising, re-framing and re-imaging lived experiences? Collaboration is employed as a structural device through which students are expected to become familiar with the advantages and constraints of working collectivity, through iteration and negotiation. 
Phase 2 students will produce a design proposition for a memorial interior, including conceptual model(s), collages, filmic and 2D representations using relevant materials and techniques.

Student Capabilities 

The ability to conceptualise and engage in idea-led design about spaces of memory
The development of skills in creating spatial interventions at a variety of scales, using a range of media and technologies
The ability to reflect, analyse, synthesise, critique and evaluate your own work as well that of your peers within the studio context
Ability to experiment and innovate within the studio context and generate compelling spatial interventions
The ability to actively research through provided texts and source additional reference material to support your design propositions. 

Key Terms

Contemporary Memorial
Interiors based on memory
Critique, evaluation of association between monumental traditions and masculinity
Engaging with fiction, non-fiction and history to generate non-metaphorical responses
Understand the distinction between authorship and ownership - when does something become collective?
Memorialising the day to day
Moving from the intangible realm of memory to the tactile
Moving from the religious to the secular
The conflict of collective memory

Precedents / references

Marion Mahoney and Walter Burley Griffin
Susan Torre
Kate Newby, Incredible Feelings
Gabriel Orozco
Cabinet of curiosities
Peter Zumpthor and Louise Bourgeois
Carlo Scarpa
Maya Lin
Dani Karavan
Carlo Scarpa
Elizabeth Birmingham
Anna Rubbo

Texts, Readings, Essays 

Douglas, Allen, Memory and Place: Two Case Studies, 2009
Dimitriopoulos, Harris, The Character of contemporary memorials, 2009
Tonkin, P and Lawrence, J, Space and Memory: A meditation on memorials and monuments, 2003
Atkinson, David, Kitch Geographies and the everyday spaces of social memory, 2006
Vernon, Christopher , A new find: interior work by Marion Mahoney Griffin, Architecture in Australia. , 2002, Vol.91(6), p.28
Clark, Justine, Splendid visions: the full set of Marion Mahoney Griffin's exquisite competition drawings for Canberra [exhibition review], Architecture Australia91.5 (September 2002): 34-35.
∞    International Archive of Women in Architecture
 https://spec.lib.vt.edu/IAWA/

 
Image by Hinode,  JAXA/NASA

Image by Hinode,  JAXA/NASA

PHASE CHANGE

THIRD YEAR STUDENTS ONLY

Studio Leaders: Dr Charles Anderson & DR Michaela Prescott (RMIT) 
Studio Consultants: Michael Trudgeon (VEIL UoM), Dylan Brady (db-Arch), Rob Gell
Research Partners: Lendlease / Victoria Harbour    
Venue: Knowledge Market, Shop 8 -10, 892 Bourke Street, Docklands VIC 3008
Time: Thursdays 10am - 2pm + occasional all day intensive workshops

SUMMARY

Phase Change2.0 explores the future of Victoria Harbour, as well as the City of Melbourne more broadly, in relation to the changing nature of the environment and our changing understanding of it. Engaging directly with global warming and its impacts at a local and regional scale, and working across a range of design disciplines and related practices, 

Phase Change 2.0 seeks to envision scenarios for sustainable and resilient futures. Phase Change 2.0 takes the form of a working design laboratory installed in a double shop front at Victoria Harbour in the Docklands, Melbourne. Evolving throughout the course of the semester, the Phase Change 2.0 studio will provide a place for discussion, debate, specula ti on and lively interaction between the public, students and a range of academics, practitioners, professionals and local stakeholders. In doing so, Phase Change 2.0 aims to foster a dynamic, participatory knowledge exchange generating a range of design provocations regarding the design of our cities. 

Within the conceptual framework of Phase Change, this studio engages with the issues of global warming across scales. Deploying a dynamic, distributed systems and ecological thinking approach, the studio aims to more clearly understand the forma ti on of things - such as ‘home’, ‘environment’, ‘harbour’, ‘city’ and ‘community’ - in order to generate design propositions for these ‘things’ which respond to the challenges and opportunities of a Phase Change world. Recognising that such design challenges are never discipline specific, this studio adopts a necessary interdisciplinary approach of thinking across disciplines and, by definition, champions a mixed mode of research and experimentation. Participants in the studio have the opportunity of working with students and researchers from the Victorian Eco Innovation Lab (VEIL) at the University of Melbourne, plus our major Industry Partner Lendlease, and a range of stakeholders including Aurecon, and the City of Melbourne. It is expected that the studio will produce a number of interrelated outcomes, from 1:1 design-make and direct site-intervention exercises, through public exhibit on and engagement processes, to large scale design propositions for Victoria Harbour and the City of Melbourne. Participants will also consult on the design and fabrication of the design laboratory environment; and convene a Public Forum discussing the work of the Phase Change studio in relation to the discourses of resilience, sustainability, and design futures, and their entanglement in the global economic, politial and cultural millieux.

Linked Seminar:

3 Horizons: an Internet of Systems Led by Aurecon, with consultation from Media Lab Melbourne Running through intensive design ‘sprints’ from Week 7.

 
Travertine & bronze wall detail by Carlo Scarpa, Fondazione Querini-Stampalia, Venice, 1949

Travertine & bronze wall detail by Carlo Scarpa, Fondazione Querini-Stampalia, Venice, 1949

SENSORY ENGAGEMENT

Tutor: Pip McCully
Schedule: Thursdays 9:00-12:00 + 12:20-15:30
Location: 045.01.005D

SUMMARY

‘The primary “object” of perception is atmospheres.  What is first and immediately perceived is neither sensations nor shapes or objects or their constellations, as Gestalt psychology thought, but atmospheres, against whose background the analytic regard distinguishes such things as objects, forms, colours etc.’  

Gernot Böhme 1993, Atmosphere as the Fundamental Concept of a New Aesthetics, Thesis Eleven

This studio will explore an innate relationship between material selection, detail, object, site and encounter using the context of retail design as an experiential case study.  
Questioning and exploring techniques of retail display, occupant ergonomics, site engagement and the conclusion of a transaction, the studio aims to give students a conceptual insight into an everyday process of commercial interior design practice.
How does interpretation of atmosphere result in tangible experiences, and specificity of site aide our perception of and engagement with objects?  How do these concepts cumulatively relate to retail design?

The studio will be broken down into three phases corresponding to the twelve weeks of teaching.
Phase 01: Atmosphere & Material will focus on engagement with materiality, material details, material junctions and the sensorial and atmospheric qualities different materials can evoke.  The aim is to question how we perceive space through material reading and the affect of material selection and detailing on our inquiry of atmosphere.
Phase 02: Display & Encounter will locate the object within a system of display, introducing concepts of approach and encounter and the acknowledgment of designing for an occupant. The aim is to promote an awareness of our occupation and movement through space, consideration of ergonomics and the testing of retail focused display.
Phase 03: Sensory Engagement manifested as a consumer based investigation will combine early explorations to result in the conceptual design and technical resolve of a retail experience.  The relationship of material selection, object, display, site and occupant experience will result in the totality of a constructed environment.

Research and precedent consideration will be offered over the course of the studio both by the studio leader and a selection of invited commercial practitioners of art and design, who will present their relevant praxis to the students.

Technology summary

The texture of a silk drape, the sharp corners of cut steel, the mottled shade and shadow of rough sprayed plaster or the sound of a spoon striking a concave wooden bowl, reveal an authentic essence which stimulates the senses.

Steven Holl 1994, Questions of Perception – Phenomenology of Architecture

The technology component of the studio will be woven closely to the conceptual framework, resulting in highly resolved, practical outcomes to each project proposition. 
Key practices and techniques will be explored to result in the following outcomes over the twelve weeks;
- Students will engage with detailed material studies and research; methods of collage; 1:1 architectural detailing; model making.
- Students will focus on experimental and observational documentation of objects and methods of display.
- Students will result in the design of a retail space, focusing on material selection and a complete set of interior architectural drawings.

The result of this exploration will be embodied in a technology summary assessed in full at the end of the semester.  

Student Capabilities 

Ability to experiment, explore & engage with student’s own creative process and interests. 

Ability to engage with theoretical concepts, processes and techniques embedded in the practical outcome of contemporary retail design practice. 

Ability to interpret and engage in critical approaches to reading and writing in regard to theoretical texts.

Ability to make aesthetic choices in 2d and 3d forms; graphic representational techniques and model making.

Approaches to methods of display, arrangement of object and exploring occupant encounter. 

Understanding contemporary practice in relation to trends in material selection, display and spatial awareness.  

Ability to make considered material selections and produce a set of interior architectural drawings to communicate conceptual intent.

Key Terms

Atmosphere, experience & wonder
Material, materiality, material junctions; sensorial & atmospheric quality
Objects, arrangement of objects, object & field
Detail & detailing, modelling
Display, systems of display
Encounter, narrative
Ergonomics, occupy
Site, site responsive
Retail, consume, consumer, occupant
Interior design praxis

Precedents / references

Carlo Scarpa
Peter Zumthor
John Pawson
Ciguë
India Mahdavi
Aesop retail environments & associated designers/architects
March Studio
Wonderwall
Rachel Whiteread
Ernesto Neto
Donald Judd
Studio Wonder
Design Office
Kim Victoria Jewels

Sites

Dover Street Market
10 Corso Como
Aesop retail environments
Site visits: to a selection of retail spaces in Melbourne

 
Image by Ultramoderne

Image by Ultramoderne

EATING EVENT #KIOSK

Tutor: Alice Parker
Schedule: Tuesdays 9:00-12:00 + Thursdays 9:00-12:00
Location: Tuesdays 100.06.007 + Thursdays 100.05.004B

SUMMARY

The role of artworks is no longer to form imaginary and utopian realties, but to actually be ways of living and models of action within the existing real, whatever the scale chosen by the artist.
Bourriaud, 1998

Eating Event #kiosk celebrates people’s growing enthusiasm for the social, the edible and the event. The proposed idea will address the habit and ritual of how we engage with food and reconsider the ritual of food in both a spatial and relational context. The aim is to explore how the ritual of food might be exploited/challenged to create social interactions with food. The theme of the studio suggests ‘childlike play’ with a classic, whimsical edge as a counterpoint.
How can we re-design food rituals in the form of events/kiosks that fascinate the user and prompt participation and conviviality?
Focusing on participation, conversation and the social space – the various phases of the project will explore ways to manifest a re appreciation of traditional food rituals. This idea seeks ways to illustrate the picturesque, observe and map food systems and design
food experiences that challenge and inspire new food rituals.
Students will be asked to explore how to engage the human senses; and test how scale, repetition, texture, colour and composition can influence a participatory experience. Food will be used in this context both as a medium and as a metaphor. We will explore the interior through observations, mappings, formatting and curation. These tasks will be carried out in a multi-layered sensorial approach, from observational drawing, thinking through making, hard copy to Instagram. Over the course of the semester you will generate research and ideas that utilise food as a tool, producing projects that range from spatial creation to events, performances and a kiosk.
How can this idea bring about a heightened experience of integration and belonging by drawing reference to food systems and consumers’ increasing desire for slower and social spaces. Grounded in the practice of interior design and thinking through making, this project will engage with craftspeople, artists, restaurants, design professionals and marketplaces (wholesale and local) and test ways to create human experiences that are welcoming, inclusive and disrupt standard routines.

Technology summary

Phase 1: SYSTEM / EXISTING CONDITIONS / EVERYDAY LIFE / CONNECTING / SOURCE
Phase 2: MARKET PLACE / EXPERIENCING / DRAWING / OBSERVING / ENGAGING
Phase 3: TABLE / RITUAL / COLOUR / CONVERSATION / INSTALLATION / PARTICIPATION
Phase 4: DECONSTRUCTING / NARRATIVE / PICNIC / KIT OF PARTS / MAKING / LANGUAGE
Phase 5: KIOSK / PARTICIPATION / PHYSICAL SITE / A RITUAL / SPATIAL

Student capabilities

Observe social behaviours (including digital hunger) in the everyday and demonstrate how design thinking can activate
Change in human food rituals.
Apply creative and critical thinking methods to aid process-based making techniques
Demonstrate an intrinsic understanding of food culture and trends in Melbourne and beyond
Resolve concepts by thinking through making and learning by doing
Project and time manage, utilisation of design processes and phasing
Articulate and present your ideas in graphic and verbal formats

Key Terms

Participatory practice
Conviviality
Relational
Food source
Social ritual
Theatrical performance

Precedents / references

Arabeschi di Latte
Marti Guixe
Ultramodern
Dimore Studio
Ryue Nishizawa
Atelier Bow-Wow
Marije Vogelzang
Jennifer Rubell
Stefan Sagmeister
Irving Penn

Texts, readings, essays

Bishop, C, 2004 Antagonism and Relational Aesthetics. Publisher TBC
Bourriaud, 1998 Relational Aesthetics. Publisher TBC
Bourke, J 2016 Pop-Up Art: Performing creative disruption in social space. Publisher TBC
De Certeau, M. 1984. The Practice of Everyday Life. London/Los Angeles: The University of California Press.
Hagen Hodgson, P. and R. Toyka. Eds. (trans. M. Robinson). 2007. Architectural Essentials. In: The Architect, the Cook and Good Taste. Basel: Birkhäuser
Huizinga, J. 1944 A Study of the play element in culture. Routledge & Kegan Paul
Morris, R. 1985. Continuous Project Altered Daily. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.
Pallasmar, J, The Eyes of the Skin : Architecture and the Senses. Publisher TBC