Design Studio

Second + Third Year
ARCH1108 ARCH1109 ARCH1119 ARCH1121

CREATIVE SPACE

Tutor: Raphael Kilpatrick
Schedule: Monday 9.30am - 12.30pm, 1.30pm - 4.30pm
Location: 8.10.24

STUDIO SUMMARY

‘Cities should be reflections of their inhabitants, not forces to be contended with’  Living Complex_Niklas Maak
Melbourne is the fastest growing city in Australia with some 1000+ new residents each month. It also produces 300 fine arts graduates each year who contribute to its rich cultural appeal. But with such increased demand on housing driving rent prices upwards can inner city suburbs continue to nurture the emerging communities that enrich them?
This design studio asks the question : what does an emerging creative community need to establish itself and can design thinking offer a way for these communities to form and grow in rapidly developing Melbourne?
The studio will investigate existing arts organisations and search for a site in which to test our ideas for our own grass roots proposals. We will have the opportunity to hear of the future visions for the area from the Yarra Council and also those of the not-for-profit emerging artist group the Schoolhouse Studios.
To explore the issues of how spatial design might help to create and support a community the studio looks to the thinking of Thomas Ermacora - Recoded City and Edward Soja - Thirdspace. The studio will be motivated by the concepts of social engagement and participatory design. Any thoughts of potential Utopia will be dispelled and inspiration will be drawn from slums, favelas and other self forming communities.
Final design outcomes for the studio will all respond to a site and an identified emerging artist community. The projects will range in size based on need and budget but all should have a strong reasoning and the ability to demonstrable social outcomes.
What does an emerging creative community need to establish itself and can design thinking offer a way for these communities to form and grow in rapidly developing Melbourne?
With ever increasing demand for residential space how can we facilitate the arts in our communities?

TECHNOLOGY

Technology will explore democratic building materials, mechanism, portable structures, expandability, multi-use as ways to support emerging creative communities.

STUDENT CAPABILITIES

+ The ability to engage with the diverse requirements of a community and design in flexibility for future growth and outreach.
+ An understanding of the consequences of design and its potential for positive social outcomes.
+ Techniques for dealing with large scale projects including documentation and planning requirements.
+ Developed understanding of basic construction techniques to assist in effective design outcomes for low budget projects.
+ Model making and documentation skills to assist the design process as well as potential end users.

KEY WORDS

+ Human Centred Design
+ Participatory design establishes parameters in which the end user can grow into and expand upon over time. This term was coined by Elemental Architects who produce exceptional low budget social housing in Chile.
+ Arrival City is a concept that expresses the key needs of an emerging community such as the ability to accept new people, an opportunity for participants to invest through contribution to local politics, education and most importantly a way beyond.
+ Social design refers to design with an outward contribution to the broader community with the hope of mutual enrichment. Physical and social mechanisms are considered through the design process to allow for variations that lead to community growth.
+ Utopia - “The true utopia is when the situation is so without issue, without a way to resolve it within the coordinates of the possible that out of a pure urge of survival you have to invent a new space... Utopia is not a free imagination, utopia is a matter of inner-most urgency...” Slavoj Zizek - Zizek!

SIGNIFICANT TEXTS + READINGS

+ Torre David - Informal Vertical Communities, Urban-Think Tank - Lars Müller Publishers 2012
+ Arrival City, Doug Saunders - NY Pantheon 2011.
+ Thirdspace, Edward Soja - Malden, MA, Blackwell 1996
+ What is a dispositif?, Michael Deleuze - Routledge NY
+ Living in the endless city, The Urban Age Project by London School of Economics - Phaidon
+ Vision for Johnston St, City of Yarra open report 2013

SIGNIFICANT PRECEDENTS 

+ Urban-Think Tank
+ Elemental
+ Rural Studio
+ Design Build BLUFF
+ A place of assembly, Schoolhouse Studios - self published 2012
+ The Social Studio

 

WALKING THROUGH WALLS

Tutor: Ying-Lan Dann
Schedule: Monday 10.00am - 1.00pm, 2.00pm - 5.00pm
Location: 8.11.58

STUDIO SUMMARY

“Walls, in the context of the Israeli/Palestinian conflict, have lost something of their traditional conceptual simplicity and material fixity, so as to be rendered - on different scales and occasions - as flexible entities, responsive to changing political and security environments; as permeable elements...temporary, contingent and never complete”  Eyal Weizman, 2005

Eyal Weizman penned these words in 2005 after observing the ‘soft’ though utterly destructive approach to walls employed by the Israeli armed forces to reach their Palestinian targets. But as well as this strategy, inspired by the work of Deleuze and Guattari, Israel also features an increasingly popular wall type, whose 1989 decommissioning in Germany was the subject of world-wide celebration; a transnational wall. Unfortunately, in 2016 for many reasons, this wall type is once again on the rise.

According to the UNHCR, in 2014 - 2015 there were around 15 million refugees and 1.2 million asylum seekers globally displaced by war and conflict. Other sources estimate this number to be far higher at 65 million displaced people. Just as the numbers of peoples displaced by war are going up around the world, so too are transnational walls; conceived by certain interests to keep others out.

Throughout this studio, we will be questioning: How might those spatial warfare strategies of flexibility, temporality and contingency adopted by the armed forces in Israel be used subversively, to serve the victims of such conflicts? How might we engender space with qualities of connectedness, rather than divisiveness? By eroding the duality of the wall, how might we understand the ‘middle’, referred to by St Arroman in his text “Movement and flow at the Boundary” and its broader relation to interiority?

The studio takes up Gordon Matta-Clark’s principal of “un-walling” and will look at a range of related artists, designers, political texts and theories that support his line of ‘anarchi-textural’ thinking. 

TECHNOLOGY

You will develop a sustained individual body of design research and technology, which will be coordinated into a folio for hand in in Week 6.  You will research the histories, functions, politics, social and material properties of this wall with a view to thoroughly understanding the background and problems of this walling type in 2016. Your final project will include reference to relevant technologies and construction methods. Throughout the studio, you will have explored a range of technical conditions through which walls can convey particular characteristics. In light of your own design brief for the SMRC, you will develop a drawing package reflecting the material, spatial and tectonic attributes of particular moments within the SMRC fit-out.

STUDENT CAPABILITIES

+ By the end of this studio, students will have developed a range of analytical skills, pertaining to our experience of the liminal spaces, such as walls, boundaries and thresholds
+ Students will develop a body of design research, through which an interior design proposal will be channeled.
+ Students will develop a comprehensive understanding of a specific transnational wall and the material, formal, theoretical, cultural, social and political environment surrounding it
+ Students will develop a range of empathic interpersonal and interpretive skills through the development of project briefs alongside genuine user groups.
+ Students will develop idiosyncratic drawing styles, which reflect each student’s conceptual response to their interior inquiry.
+ Students will develop a thorough understanding of walls, boundaries, borders, curtains and other such liminal conditions.

KEY WORDS

+ Fluid, ghost and oceanic walls
+ Externally, the wall has two faces, how might we consider its ‘middle’ in respect to interiority
+ Porosity, permeability, temporality of the wall
+ Empathy for refugee and asylum seeker experience

SIGNIFICANT TEXTS + READINGS

+ Brown, M, Walled States, Waning Sovereignty Zone Books, New York, 2010
+ Ingold, T, ‘Wall’, in The Life of Lines, Routledge, London and New York, 2015
+ Ayme, M, The Man Who Walked through walls, Pushkin Press, London, 1943
+ Weisman, E, Walking Through Walls, Soldiers as architects in the Isreal – Palestine conflict., 2005
+ St Arroman, Claude, Movement and Flow at the boundary, Goldsmith University, London, 2011
+ Colomina, Betrix, Un-distrurbed SANNA at the Barcelona Pavilion, Cat. Essay 2008

SIGNIFICANT PRECEDENTS

+ “Chasing Asylum” -TBC
+ Borders, Barriers, Walls Exhibiton, Monash University Museum of Art, May 2016
+ Petra Blaisse, Venice Bienniel
+ Gordon Matta-Clark
+ Themrock, film
+ Francis Alys

 

WONDERLAND - HOmeLY cREatUreS

Tutor: Andrew Miller
Schedule: Tuesday 9.30am - 12.30pm, 2.30pm - 5.30pm
Location: 8.12.36

STUDIO SUMMARY

This studio works on the premise that architectural design (interior and exterior) is a semi-living thing Eg. In all its guises (for better or worse) –  it is an affective ecology of ‘things’; an assemblage of materials, atmospherics, memories, objects, bodies (inanimate and animate), forming mutually a nurturing relationship for living.
The design of our living spaces, in particular, the house floor plan, has change little over the past 100 years, this is mainly due to an economic rationalist approach to design, where costs and building regulations have facilitated interiors of efficiency rather than the design of interiors that explore the ‘earthy, physical and sensuous aspect of our creaturely existence’. The emergence of new technologies such as modelling software, 3d printing, robotics, digital fabrication, virtual reality, ‘smart’ materials, to name a few, hold the potential to radically transform the way we design and construct our spaces for living. These advances in technologies allows for speculation on future directions as to how we might design our homes and interior design as a discipline.
Through the lens of speculative futures, participants will develop a series of design proposals for their own homes, (house, apartment, caravan etc) that will express, amplify or question the concept of the creaturely and semi-living architecture. All proposals will also incorporate a vision of the future based on the individual desires of each participant.
These initial design proposals will directly inform phase 2; the design of a speculative home of the future

TECHNOLOGY

The overall technological concern for this studio is for students to experiment, develop and express a design making language that is specific to the approach and logic of each students design speculation.
As a way of developing and expressing this language participants will begin by producing a series of digital speculative responses to the weekly design briefs, engaging with the techniques of digital modelling, digital image making, hand modelling, photography, film and graphics.
As the design process progresses through the semester, students will engage with digital modelling techniques using software packages such as, Rhino, Tsplines, Blender, Mudbox etc then prototype their ideas through digital fabrication techniques such as, laser cut model making, thermoforming and cnc milling in conjunction with graphic visualisation techniques that communicate each participants speculative future.

STUDENT CAPABILITIES

+ The ability to engage analytically and imaginatively through design using theoretical concepts
+ The ability to effectively express and articulate a visual design language in relation to thelogic of the design proposal.
+ The ability to understand making, drawing, craftingand digital fabrication as a way of understanding materials and their spatial effects.
+ The ability to refine design through iteration

KEY WORDS

Semi-Living Architecture, Creaturely, Retro Futurism, Speculative Futures, Magical Realism,  Assemblage, Design ecology

SIGNIFICANT TEXTS + READINGS

+ Greg Lynn – A new Style of Life
+ Dunne and Raby – Speculative Everything
+ Pelle Ehn – Making futures: Marginal notes on innovation
+ Sofia Borges - The tale of Tomorrow: Utopian Architecture in the Modernist Realm
+ Juhani Pallassmaa – The eyes of the Skin:

SIGNIFICANT PRECEDENTS

+ Greg Lynn
+ Francois Roche R&Sie(n)
+ Retro Futurism
+ Liam Young
+ Magic Realism
+ Arakawa and Gins
+ Archigram
+ Michael Hansmeyer/

 

GETTING HERE

Tutor: Roger Kemp & Anthony Fryatt
Additional contributions: Professor Michael Trudgeon, RMIT School of A & D
Schedule: Tuesday 9.30am - 12.30pm, 2.30pm - 5.30pm
Location: 8.11.51

Key Stakeholder: Westfield / Scentre Group
Rebecca Burk, National Retailer Accounts Manager
Scentre Group National Shop Openings

STUDIO SUMMARY

This studio will be venturing from the CBD, traveling out, crossing the thresholds of suburbia and entering into the highly internalised condition of the suburban shopping centre. It will examine the Westfield Shopping Centre, Doncaster to learn and develop new ways of thinking about this retail format.  
The focus will be to challenge a number of conventional typologies found there: the retail box, the kiosk and the food court. By adopting the design strategy of hybridization the studio will ask if these three broad retail typologies can be brought together to produce innovative experiences for consumers/customers/inhabitants.

Methods
The studio will use a combination of drawing techniques including diagram, illustration and orthographic drawing to analyse the prevalent spatial strategies used within the existing retail environment.‘Scenic’ models will be developed to test new spatio-temporal propositions for the centre.

The studio will commence with a series of research tasks, conducted individually and collectively in small groups. This research phase will establish the key design agendas of the studio. Techniques of hybridization will be developed as the studio moves from a speculative to propositional phase of concept and design development.We will observe and analyze spatial and temporal conditions by spending time working at the centre. Methods of simple 1:1 prototyping and bodystorming will allow further testing of ideas.

TECHNOLOGY

The approach to technology will be developed through the refinement of analogue and digital techniques of drawing and making. Using orthographic drawings, diagrams, collage and scenic models you will build both conceptual and practical knowledge about how the shopping centre operates as a complex set of strategies and systems organized through a varied, sprawling built environment. This will include considerations of business such as strategy, brand, media, food and retail operations, tenancy, design approval as well as an ongoing understanding of materials and details encountered

STUDENT CAPABILITIES

+ How is shopping centre experience currently structured through design?
+ What is the potential for shifting this experience through the strategy of hybridizing existing prevalent spatial strategies?
+ How can this approach allow for inhabitants to be engaged and activated in the structuring of their own experience?
+ How might drawing and scenic techniques be usefully incorporated into methods of design research for retail and shopping centres?

KEY WORDS

+ Experience
+ Duration
+ Encounter
+ Consumer
+ Inhabitant
+ Participant
+ Typology
+ Program
+ Hybridization

SIGNIFICANT TEXTS + READINGS

+ Marc Augé. Non-Places : Introduction to an Anthropology of Supermodernity. London ; New York: Verso, 1995.
+ Zygmunt Bauman. Consuming Life. Polity Press, 2007.
+ J. G. Ballard. Kingdom Come. Fourth Estate, 2006.
+ Aaron Betsky K. Michael Hays, and Laurie Anderson. Scanning: The Aberrant Architectures of Diller + Scofidio. Whitney Museum, 2003.
+ Atelier Brückner. Scenography : Make Spaces Talk, Atelier Brückner 2002-2010. Stuttgart: AVedition, 2010.
+ Chuihua Judy Chung, Jeffrey Inaba, Rem Koolhaas, and Sze Tsung Leong.
+ The Harvard Design School Guide to Shopping / Harvard Design School Project on the City 2. Taschen, 2002.
+ Peter Eisenman. Diagram Diaries (Architecture). Thames & Hudson Ltd, 1999. Robert Klanten. Staging Space: Scenic Interiors and Spatial Experiences. Die Gestalten Verlag, 2010.
+ Naomi Klein,. No Logo: Taking Aim At the Brand Bullies. Picador, 2000

SIGNIFICANT PRECEDENTS

+ O.M.A./ Rem Koolhaas. http://oma.eu/
+ Wonderwall, Tokyo. http://wonder-wall.com/
+ Campaign, London.  http://www.campaigndesign.co.uk/
+ Galeries Lafayette, Boulevard Haussmann, Paris. www.galerieslafayette.com
+ Le Bon Marché, Paris. http://www.lebonmarche.com/en.html
+ The Hall, San Francisco. http://www.thehallsf.com/#about
+ Dover Street Market, Comme Des Garcons. http://www.doverstreetmarket.com

 

 

ACTUALIZING AIR

Tutor: Chris Cottrell
Schedule: Tuesday 9.30am - 12.30pm, 2.30pm - 5.30pm
Location: 8.11.18

STUDIO SUMMARY

“It is easy to overlook something that's invisible. We don't commonly notice our breathing, though it enables all we do notice. And we don't commonly see the air, since it's that through which we see everything else. … We rarely acknowledge the atmosphere as it swirls between two people, or two buildings. We don't speak of the air between our body and a nearby tree, but rather the empty space between us. It’s empty. Just an absence of stuff, without feeling or meaning: a void.”  - David Abram, ‘Commonwealth of Breath’ in All Our Relations 2012, p.335

But of course, nothing could be further from actuality. The spaces between us are brimming with information, affective forces, weather, sounds and smells. Rather than beginning with an idea of space as empty or neutral, this studio asks you to foreground air as design concern — a medium to attune to and work with. Some key questions will be: • How does air affect us, how do we affect air? • How can interior design processes enable us to become more aware of the air around us? • What can air do, what can you do with air?

In the first half of the semester you will work in groups of three to undertake two shorter projects:
+ Framing air, which will focus on 1:1 making / prototyping of inflatable structures.
+ Visualising air, which will focus on drawing techniques for recording aspects of air.

These workshops will provide you particular strategies for working with air — techniques, contexts, modes of making and communicating. These strategies form a foundation for the second part of the semester, in which you can choose to work either independently or continue in groups. Based on your particular strategies and interests you will be guided to develop your own brief. This will be for a larger design proposition that ‘actualizes air’ in the form of an ephemeral installation in public space.

TECHNOLOGY

You will work with a range of technologies, from prototyping your own inflatable structures at 1:1 scale, constructing drawing or visualisation devices, to selecting appropriate technologies (including speculative and/or experimental material and structural systems) for your design proposition. The studio will also emphasize critical thinking in the selection of media, processes and communication strategies. To this end, there will be a series of pin-ups where other students will ‘read’ your work back to you. This provides an opportunity for you to reflect on what your drawings, models, videos saying about your ideas and design proposition. As this is a studio about experiencing air, you can expect an emphasis on sectional drawing.

STUDENT CAPABILITIES

+ An increased awareness and sensitivity to air as a medium for practising interior design
+ Skills in making inflatable structures at 1:1 scale
+ Skills in working collectively through communication, leadership, negotiation and collaboration
+ To apply critical thinking skills to the selection of media, processes and communication strategies

SIGNIFICANT TEXTS + READINGS

+ Abram, David. (2012). The Commonwealth of Breath. All our relations : 18th Biennale of Sydney / editors: Catherine de Zegher and Gerald McMaster. M. C. d. Zegher. [NSW]:, Biennale of Sydney: 334-341.
+ Ant Farm. (1973). Inflatocookbook. San Francisco, CA. Bakke, Monika. (2006).
+ Going aerial : air, art, architecture. Maastricht, Jan van Eyck Academie.
+ Bakke, Monika. (2011). "The Life of Air: Dwelling, Communicating, Manipulating.” Retrieved June, 2016, from http://www.livingbooksaboutlife.org/books/The_Life_of_Air.
+ Ingold, Tim. (2010). "Footprints through the weather-world: walking, breathing, knowing." Journal of the Royal Anthropological Institute 16: S121-S139.
+ Irigaray, Luce. (1999). The forgetting of air in Martin Heidegger Luce Irigaray; translated by Mary Beth Mader. Austin, University of Texas Press.
+ Sloterdijk, Peter (2011). Bubbles : microspherology. Los Angeles, CA ; Cambridge, Mass., Semiotext(e); Distributed by MIT Press.

SIGNIFICANT PRECEDENTS

Cameron Robbins, Fujiko Nakaya, Tomas Saraceno, Malte Wagenfeld, Andy Warhol — Silver Clouds, Haus Rucker Co., Michaela Gleave, Hans Haacke, Philippe Rahm / Decosterd & Rahm, Lebbeus Woods — The Storm, Behn Zeitlin — Beasts of the Southern Wild, Architects of Air, MOS — Instant Untitled, Diller Scofidio + Renfro — Hirshhorn Museum, Blur pavilion, Patricia Piccinini

 

THE GUESTHOUSE PROJECT

Tutor: Caroline Vains & Christof Mayer
Schedule: Tuesday 9.30am - 12.30pm, 2.30pm - 5.30pm
Location: 8.11.46

STUDIO SUMMARY

A guesthouse house is a kind of lodging, similar to a bed and breakfast or inn. It is often a private home that has been converted for guest accommodation with the owner living in a separate area within the property. Guesthouses are notable for being quiet, safe, cosy and comfortable, and for offering healthy, home-made food and personalised attention.

This studio will explore the guesthouse typology in the context of refugees, asylum seekers and migration. It will comprise three stages. The first stage (Weeks 3-8) will explore the notion of the guesthouse. We will begin by using drawing, diagramming and model-making to unpack the characteristics that define the guesthouse. What are its characteristics, qualities, spatial typologies, atmospheres, relationalities etc.? We will then investigate how these may be adapted and applied to bring recent refugees together with Melbourne’s longer-term residents in a guesthouse program involving cross-cultural sharing and exchange.

These investigations will lead into the second stage of the studio: a two-week intensive in Weeks 9 and 10 (19 September – 2 October) where we will design and construct a full-scale temporary guesthouse structure on an old primary school site in Brunswick to house the program of cross-cultural exchange. Christof Mayer from the internationally acclaimed experimental architecture collective known as raumlabor.berlin has agreed to come to Melbourne to lead this intensive. Raumlabor formed in Berlin in 1999 and has a design practice that specialises (among other things) in temporary urban interventions and community activation through design. They have extensive experience in facilitating participatory design and construct workshops in many countries around the world and it is a great opportunity for us to work with one of their founding members. The Guesthouse project is loosely based on one of raumlabor’s current projects in Berlin called ‘Die Gärtnerei’.

The studio will conclude with a loosely curated public launch/event in which members of the wider community will be invited to participate in the program of cross-cultural exchange and share music, food and conversation. Students will be involved in curating and hosting this event. This is the third and final stage of the studio and it will run through Weeks 11-12 with the event itself currently planned for Saturday 15th October in Week 12 (tbc).

TECHNOLOGY

The technology component of the studio will focus on the design and construct intensive stage of the studio. During the intensive you will learn how to design and construct full-scale temporary structures made out of a range of materials using workshop technologies.  Materials used will depend on the final design and may include timber, plyboard, besser blocks, etc. There will also be a strong emphasis on sustainable materials and construction practices. Students will be introduced to the idea of pre-cycling (using materials without damaging them so they can be used again), and encouraged to incorporate and source recycled materials and up-cycle found objects.

STUDENT CAPABILITIES

+ Apply strategies of drawing, diagramming and model-making to analyse an existing spatial typology and creatively adapt it to an expanded program.
+ Develop strategies for applying design to facilitate a social program involving cross-cultural exchange and social inclusion between refugees and the wider community.
+ Develop design and construct skills using a range of materials and workshop technologies to build a full-scale temporary guesthouse structure.
+ Design and build for the public in a public space.
+ Develop and apply knowledge of sustainable materials and construction practices inclusive of pre-cycling, recycling and up-cycling.
+ Learn how to work individually (during stage 1 of the studio) to unpack and generate design.
+ Learn how to work collectively (stage 3) to construct a full-scale structure.
+ Curate and facilitate a public cross-cultural design event.

Important note:

This studio commences in week 3 on Tuesday 2 August.
Students interested to do this studio must be prepared to commit to the 2 week intensive during week 9 & 10 (9 September – 2 October) and to curating and facilitating the public launch event over the course of week 11-12. The extra hours involved in the intensive will count towards the studios required non-contact hours. Allowances will be made for students to attend their other classes during this time.

 

INTERIM

Tutor: Linda Raimondo
Schedule: Tuesday 9.30am - 12.30pm, 2.30pm - 5.30pm
Location: 8.11.47

STUDIO SUMMARY

Interim is a studio that explores concepts of community, shared networks and collective culture in the suburb of Brunswick. The project will involve collaborating with Neometro - property developers who have proposed a residential development on the Jewell station site. The studio intends to produce a series of events that activate the existing site through temporary spatial installation.
It will involve creating an ‘interim’ phase that engages and celebrates the community. This makeshift phase is a critical step to ensure we are designing spaces which reflect and connect the surrounding neighbourhood.
Students will develop methods to designing through intervention and installation as well as temporary scenarios which can be relocated to different sites for multiple use.
Research into the community and culture will be integral to establishing this transitory event. The surrounding site analysis will be realized through recording, documenting and observing local inhabitants/ surroundings and visually displaying these using graphic techniques.
The final assessment will require students to produce a temporary program of events where they identify potential partners to collaborate on the project.
Phase 1
This phase will involve a series of briefs that will explore the existing site and the surrounding community through recording, observing and documenting existing conditionsStudents will produce collages, posters and graphic interpretations of their analysis.
Phase 2
This phase will ask students to design a program of events in response to the community and site research. Through experimental processes students will design an ‘interim’ installation.

Questions
+ How do you engage the community and take them on a journey?
+ What makes a dynamic and thriving society?
+ What does it mean to be temporary?
+ How do you survey people?
+ What are interesting ways to document a survey graphically in 2d?
+ How do we create a temporary set of opportunities rather than permanent ones?

TECHNOLOGY

Will occur in 2 phases.
Phase 1
Observation / Research / Record
Surveys, Mapping, Diagrams, Research, Infographics

Phase 2
Exploration / Programming / Material Gestures
Model making, Space planning, Programming, Material specification, Drawing

STUDENT CAPABILITIES

+ Analysis and interpretation of theoretical statements
+ Survey investigation
+ Ethnographic research
+ Infographic interpretation and design
+ Reflection on design processes
+ Setting of briefs for design exercises
+ Programming & designing a temporary event

KEY WORDS

+ Brain mapping
+ Data collection
+ Shared
+ Connected
+ Community
+ Tactical urbanism
+ Interim

SIGNIFICANT TEXTS + READINGS

+ Creating Cities_Marcus Westbury
+ Living in the endless city_
+ Happy City_Charles Montgomery
+ Living Complex_Niklas Mak
+ Self made city
+ The future laboratory_trend briefing_symbiotic branding

SIGNIFICANT PRECEDENTS

The Richmond Weekender_Foolscap Studio
+ Meeting bowls_Times Square_NYC
+ Shadowboxing Exhibition / Slowscape Collective_The Royal College of Art
+ Shigeru Ban_Temporary design
+ Arnsdorf pop up store_Edwards Moore
+ The edges of the world_Ernesto Neto

 

DESIGN FOR CARE 2

Tutor: Leah Heiss
Schedule: Tuesday 9.30am - 12.30pm, 2.30pm - 5.30pm
Location: ONJ Site

STUDIO SUMMARY

This studio is embedded in the ONJ Centre at the Austin Hospital in Heidelberg. Each Tuesday you will be working within the hospital, engaging with clinical and support staff, patients and families. Through the semester we will undertake a wide range of activities to engage staff, patients and families in the design process. These will include mapping activities, participating in art therapy sessions, conducting workshops and engaging in 1:1 and group interviews. You will have access to inpatient wards (cancer and palliative care); day oncology; radiation oncology; information centres; gardens and waiting spaces.

The studio is focused on the emotional journey of people as they go through cancer treatment and analyses how the spatial and service environment responds to the emotional needs of users. Design for Care 2 questions what interior designers can learn from co-design and service design as modes for understanding patient experience. We will also create tools for engagement as a way to engage people in the design of environments and experiences for care. The studio will investigate:

What could a care practice look like? Where is traditional interior design and architecture failing to provide environments that cater for the social and emotional experience of people, as well as their treatment needs?

How can we understand the lived experience of people as they move through and beyond the healthcare experience? Can we adopt a person-centred approach across the whole journey of care?

How can design thinking and interior design practice, which is focused on understanding social and emotional relationships in the spatial context, bring new ideas to existing patient experience issues?

How can co-design and service design ideas be adapted to a spatial practice?
The final projects will be self-directed and will aim to improve the human experience of the ONJ Centre spaces and services. Projects may range from the development of sonic environments; new ways to engage young people in the treatment process; better modes for engaging with information; the development of creative spaces within the hospital environment; the development of wellness spaces, gardens, reading rooms etc. etc.

TECHNOLOGY

Design for Care will draw on a wide range of technologies, including: developing experiential tools for user engagement; creating films; conducting workshops; developing personas; experiential mapping; creating user journeys; developing sectional experiential drawings; creating sonic landscapes etc.

STUDENT CAPABILITIES

+ Developing projects which engage with the emotional experience of users in the cancer journey
+ Creating innovative ways to map the care journey through diagrammatic, filmic and other communication modes
+ Developing knowledge of the care system and an understanding about how this could be improved through the process of design
+ Development of competencies around co-design principles as a way of engaging with patients through a care experience
+ Development of innovative ways to map the care journey through diagrammatic, filmic and other communication modalities.

KEY WORDS

Wellness, care, co-design, patient experience, embedded practice, human-centred design, patient experience.

SIGNIFICANT TEXTS + READINGS

+ Boyd, Hilary, Stephen McKernon, Bernie Mullin, and Andrew Old. ‘Improving Healthcare through the Use of Co-Design’. The New Zealand Medical Journal 125, no. 1357 (29 June 2012): 76–87.
+ Cross, Nigel, Designerly Ways of Knowing. 1 edition. Basel; London: Birkhäuser Architecture, 2007.
+ Dorst, Kees, and Nigel Cross. ‘Creativity in the Design Process: Co-Evolution of Problem–solution’. Design Studies 22, no. 5 (September 2001): 425–37. doi:10.1016/S0142-694X(01)00009-6.
+ Jones, Peter. ‘How the Design Industry Must Change’. In Design for Care. Rosenfeld Media, 2013. http://proquest.safaribooksonline.com.ezproxy.lib.rmit.edu.au/book/design/9781457102905/introduction/ch00lev1sec1_html.
+ Jones, Peter. Design for Care: Innovating Healthcare Experience. 1st edition. Brooklyn, N.Y: Rosenfeld Media, 2013.
+ Sanders, Elizabeth B. N., and Pieter Jan Stappers. 2008. “Co-creation and the new landscapes of design.”  CoDesign 4 (1):5-18.
+ Sanders, Elizabeth B. N., and Pieter Jan Stappers. 2014. “Probes, toolkits and prototypes: three approaches to making in codesigning.”  CoDesign 10 (1):5-14.

SIGNIFICANT PRECEDENTS

+ PROUD Co-design
+ http://www.proudeurope.eu/
+ Lancaster University, Impact Lancaster Collaboration & Impact Toolbox
+ POKO, Children’s Oncology Department, University Medical Centre, Groningen
+ Imagination Lancaster University: Beyond the Castle
+ Children’s Hospice Association Scotland, Robin House
+ Maggie’s Centres, United Kingdom