2015 Semester 2

 

LOST IN TRANSLATION

Tutor: Belinda Grant

Lost in Translation was a design studio where students were immersed in the practices of Translation, Recombination and Integration by engaging in a series of weekly exercises. Students learnt to apply these techniques to switch back and forth between 2D, 3D and 3D++ at both a spatial and a conceptual level. We produced a catalogue to act as a repository for recording progress, using text, diagrams, collage and mapping, and a series of objects and collages which explored the practices of a selection of artists, designers and architects. Ultimately, students produced drawings, models and objects for a final project: an Education Centre at Heide MOMA.

 

 

BERLIN: LITTLE UTOPIAS IN BIG SPACES

Tutor: Caroline Vains

This studio/specialisation addressed the Kulturforum, both in terms of its challenges and its opportunities.

It investigated how the Kulturforum’s urban spaces, buildings and monuments impose behaviours and narratives, exercise power, impinge on our autonomy, exclude and otherwise alienate us. It then explored opportunities for embedding these spaces with temporary places that are human scaled and/or human centred. In this way, we pursued a hopeful vision where bottom up and top down design meet and co-produce little utopias in big spaces.

 

COMMUNITIES OF PRACTICE: EXPLORING MATERIALS & SITE

Tutor: Debra Kunda

Communities of Practice explored design concepts centred on the production and the presentation of art. The studio asked how we as designers can critically explore the tradition of design as a tool that ‘objectively’ frames a site and experience.

 

BINARIES AND DISPLACEMENTS

Tutor: Liz Lambrou

Binaries and Displacements was a studio that explored the ambiguous spaces of mixed reality; the studio considered configured space as a platform for enabling multiple experiences rather than prescribing one kind of spatial outcome. 

 

SPATIAL INTERVENTIONS

Tutor: Lucy Hall

This studio explored the architecture of experience. From scent to sight to surprise, what role can design play in shaping our everyday experiences? The way we experience/interact with spaces and environments has a huge impact on the way we feel, connect, engage and respond to our surrounding environment. How do we design for experience? When we expand our framework to encompass a multi-sensory dimension, how does it impact our outcomes or the way we occupy space? This studio explored some of the ways we can design and define space from ideology to intention to immersion.

 

 

INCIDENTAL EXCHANGES

Tutor: Pandarosa

Incidental Exchanges was a studio which explored ideas concerning the activation of space by investigating diverse methods and approaches towards the re-appropriation of site. Through a series of site visits, peer-reviews, physical engagement and individual lead investigations, participants were asked to analyse, extract, research, strategise and identify ways in which alternate conditions can be applied to existing dormant areas.

 

SURFACE SCENARIOS & MATERIAL ADVENTURES IN DEPTH ~ TACTICS FOR PROLIFERATING THE PHOTOGRAPHIC IMAGE

Tutor: Phoebe Whitman

This studio examined and expanded the conventional definitions of photography through a series of explorative project briefs that attempted to challenge the assumption that photography is solely a representational medium. By exploring the process of picture making in a two dimensional way, ideas related to the exploitation and the proliferation of images engaged students in a contemporary discourse that explores the medium between photography and concept of interiority and interior making.

 

FLOATING POINT

Tutor: Raph Kilpatrick + Jess Wood + Roger Kemp

This design studio sort to develop strategies to better understand and design for communities. Initially the attention was focused on Tonlé Sap, a large body of water found in Cambodia, and how we can design floating structures to better support the current and future needs of the communities which exist along this lake. The second half of the semester took the information and research collected, in regards to Tonle Sap and community, and employed this within a short design brief based around the idea of exchange within an imagined city.